Reviews for My Spring Robin


School Library Journal Reviews 1989 July
PreS-Gr 1-- Incorporating more plot than in their earlier first concept books, the Rockwells present a simple and briefly told story of a young girl who goes out on the first day of spring to search for the robin whose song so impressed her the previous summer. Before she finds ``my spring robin,'' she encounters a variety of signs of the new season in her backyard: a toad and an earthworm; crocus, forsythia, magnolia, violets, and daffodils blooming; and fiddlehead ferns emerging. Cheery, bright pencil-and-watercolor illustrations offer a child's perspective of the outdoors. While few children will actually find all these plants blooming on the same day, the author and illustrators mention and depict enough easily recognizable signs of spring to make this book especially useful to libraries serving very young children. This attractive introduction to the natural world will be welcomed by adults searching for a simple, realistic story of the season. --Ellen Fader, Westport Public Library, Conn. Copyright 1989 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 1989 August
PreS-Gr 1-- Incorporating more plot than in their earlier first concept books, the Rockwells present a simple and briefly told story of a young girl who goes out on the first day of spring to search for the robin whose song so impressed her the previous summer. Before she finds ``my spring robin,'' she encounters a variety of signs of the new season in her backyard: a toad and an earthworm; crocus, forsythia, magnolia, violets, and daffodils blooming; and fiddlehead ferns emerging. Cheery, bright pencil-and-watercolor illustrations offer a child's perspective of the outdoors. While few children will actually find all these plants blooming on the same day, the author and illustrators mention and depict enough easily recognizable signs of spring to make this book especially useful to libraries serving very young children. This attractive introduction to the natural world will be welcomed by adults searching for a simple, realistic story of the season. --Ellen Fader, Westport Public Library, Conn. Copyright 1989 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2014 November

PreS-Gr 1--A child remembers the robin that sang for her the previous summer and anticipates its return. Everywhere she looks she finds signs of spring. The crocus are blooming, the forsythia bush is a mass of yellow blossoms, and the fiddlehead ferns are pushing their way through last year's brown leaves. But no robin sits on a branch in the magnolia tree or seems to be anywhere in her yard. She sees a small toad hiding behind a clump of daffodils and a shiny earthworm among the purple violets. Then she hears her robin's song--Cheer-up, cheerilee! Cheer-up, cheerilee!/Cheer-up, cheerilee!" Her spring robin has returned. Pencil and watercolor illustrations on uncrowded spreads are just right for this gentle tale. An almost life-sized picture of the bird appears on both the first and last pages. The simple text and realistic artwork will certainly remind children to keep their eyes open and their ears attuned to the coming of spring. Originally published in 1987, this edition has a new jacket and refreshed interior art.--Mary Jean Smith, formerly at Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN

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