Reviews for Free Fall


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2009 Spring
A reissue of Wiesner's first authored book, a wordless Caldecott Honor winner, about a boy's journey to a strange kingdom in dreams. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1988 March #3
Wiesner creates a wonderful dream sequence in a wordless exploration that makes the picture book format seem limitless. Gray-and-green gingham squares of a sleeping boy's coverlet flow into the patchwork fields of a landscape, with mountains in the blue-green distance. Onto this checked ground, figures like chess pieces appear, pages turn to castles and turrets with knights and moatsstill using the shapes and colors of the first bedroom scene. The dreaming boy, clad in his pajamas, visits castles and slays a mottled green dragon. Next he sprawls like Gulliver among the Lilliputians, and then journeys into an urban dreamland: tenements instead of castles, rooftops with aerials instead of parapets. A last ride up on a swan's back, over a green-checked seascape of waves and shadows brings him ashore, and back to his bed. This unbroken dreamscape is artfully carried through a blending of ancient and modern motifs; the book is an exceptional choice for children and visually enticing for older readers as well. Ages 6-10. (April) Copyright 1988 Cahners Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1991 August #4
A boy falls asleep and experiences several wordless, surreal journeys. PW said, ``This unbroken dreamscape is artfully carried through a blending of ancient and modern motifs; the book is an exceptional choice for children and visually enticing for older readers.'' Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 1991 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 1988 June
Gr 2-5 In an odd wordless picture book about a dream, a fair-haired boy falls asleep while reading an ominous looking atlas. As he floats through sky and slumber, the boy's green checked bedspread is transformed into an aerial view of the earth. He then descends upon an enormous chess board complete with mortal playing pieces. This medieval welcoming party leads the youngster to their mazed castle where he continues his search (although this is not always clear) for an elusive map. The nameless protagonist's ensuing adventures are confusing, complicated, and illogical. Transformations abound in this surrealistic universe. Floating leaves change into swans, fortress walls become dragons, building fronts turn into mountains. The influence of such literary classics as Gulliver's Travels, The Wizard of Oz, and The Water-Babies, along with the artistry of Raphael, Escher, and Sendak, is apparent. Soft shades of green, blue, and yellow dominate the action. Technical virtuosity is the trademark of the double-page watercolor spreads. Especially notable is the solidity of forms and architectural details. While many of the illustrations are stunning, if somewhat slick, they work better as individual pieces than as a whole. This book lacks the sequence and logic required by young children, and it will have limited appeal among older children. Julie Corsaro, University of Chicago Laboratory Schools Copyright 1988 Cahners Business Information.

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