Reviews for How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World


Horn Book Guide Reviews 1994
An amusing how-to book on making an apple pie starts when a young girl finds the market closed. She sets out to find the ingredients in their original forms, starting with wheat in Italy and then moving on to France for the chicken (to lay the egg), to Sri Lanka for the cinnamon, and so on. The story is illustrated with light, cheerful pictures of the determined girl and her international destinations. Recipe included. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 1994 June
~ What if the market was closed when you wanted to bake a pie? You could embark for Europe, learn Italian en route, and pick up some semolina wheat in Italy, an egg in France, kurundu bark for cinnamon in Sri Lanka, and an entire cow in England (butter) before coming home via Jamaica (sugar) and Vermont (apples). The expertly designed illustrations in which a dark-haired lass journeys by various means to these interesting places to get her groceries are lovely and lively, and the narrative, too, travels at a spritely pace. The journey is neither quite logical enough to be truly informative nor quite bizarre enough to be satisfyingly silly, while the rich, sweet recipe that's appended will take some adult assistance. Still, fun. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright 1999 Kirkus Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1994 April #2
A yen to bake sends a girl on a worldwide shopping spree to gather ingredients for that favorite all-American treat, apple pie. Priceman ( The Tiny, Tiny Boy and the Big, Big Cow ) is a master of whimsy (the chicken chosen to lay the eggs, for example, falls to earth in a parachute). Energetic watercolors radiate an offbeat nostalgia; although they're not moored in any particular period, they contain an appealing jumble of details, from Edwardian (an antique pram; turn-of-the-century millinery) through the present day (a yellow school bus). Priceman addresses her audience directly, an astute device that draws readers in and lets them accompany the pinafore-clad, Madeleine-esque cook on her travels, from the Italian countryside (she's there for the semolina wheat) to Sri Lanka (for cinnamon, from the bark of the kurundu tree) to Jamaica (for the sugar cane) and home via Vermont (the apples, of course). At last, the pie is baked and feasted upon by the girl and all the friends she has made on her travels. For those inevitably salivating by the final page, a recipe is included. Ages 4-8. (May) Copyright 1994 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 1994 June
Gr 1-3-In this whimsical, geographical shopping journey, a young baker thinks of how to proceed if the market is closed. She directs readers, via various modes of transportation, to gather seminola wheat in Italy, a chicken (for its egg) in France, bark from the kurundu (cinnamon) tree in Sri Lanka, a cow (for butter) in England, salt water and sugar cane in Jamaica, and apples in Vermont. Processing the worldly ingredients is quickly handled, a pie is baked, and friends are invited to share. A look around the table reveals children from all of the countries in which the foods have been found. A recipe for apple pie appears on the last page. The brightly colored pictures are fanciful, revealing cheerful, busy people working in towns, fields, and forests of the various countries. The purposeful girl in a green pinafore collects her ingredients with enthusiasm and good cheer. A lighthearted, pleasurable selection.-Carolyn Jenks, First Parish Unitarian Church, Portland, ME Copyright 1994 Cahners Business Information.

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