Reviews for Froggy Goes to Bed


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 March 2000
Ages 3^-5. Froggy is tired out from a long, hard day of play, but he puts off bedtime as long as possible. Every part of the ritual involves a search: for his boat (found in the laundry bin); for his pajamas (found behind his desk); for his toothbrush (found in the cookie jar); and so on. Froggy goes to sleep only after his mother, trying to keep her eyes open during the bedtime story, begins to snore. Preschoolers will enjoy the combination of the familiar situations and good-natured silliness, as they watch this master staller at work. The accessible text, with its sound effects and overall sense of fun, is a pleasure to read aloud. Even nonreaders can enjoy the story through the cartoonlike illustrations, notable for their buoyancy of line and vibrancy of colors. Another winning entry in the Froggy series. ((Reviewed March 1, 2000)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2000 Fall
When his mother says it's bedtime, Froggy has to find his pajamas and his huggy; he needs a glass of water and wants a story. Froggy's desire to postpone bedtime is portrayed both in the text and in the bright illustrations with humor and understanding, although neither his excuses nor the ending are unique. Nevertheless, Froggy's fans will enjoy this newest addition to his adventures. Copyright 2000 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 2000 May #2
The effervescent Froggy is up to usual tricks in his eighth appearance (Froggy Plays Soccer, 1999, etc.). After a hard day of play, he may be "too pooped to pop." But coming wide awake at the magic words "It's time for bed!," he runs his patient mother through a string of delaying tactics, from a snack to a search for a "lost" toy. Each activity, of course, is accompanied by Froggy's classic sound effects: lots of "flop, flop, flop[s]," with an occasional "zwoop" and a "glug, glug, glug" as well. Remkiewicz (Rabbit's Pajama Party, 1999, etc.) depicts the tug-of-war in broadly drawn cartoon scenes, many of which feature mother pointing one way as the pajama-clad Froggy hops another--but it's all plainly more friendly ritual than battle. Mother at last sitsdown to read a bedtime story and, naturally, falls asleep, "snoring like a horse." Froggy gives her a good-night nuzzle and drifts off. It's a jolly take on a theme as evergreen as the characters, though unlike Peggy Rathmann's 10 Minutes Till Bedtime (1998), it may give Froggy's younger fans some new bedtime maneuvers. (Picture book. 4-7) Copyright 2000 Kirkus Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 2000 June
PreS-Gr 1-Froggy's stalling tactics will delight any child who has ever begged to stay up just a few more minutes. When his mother announces that it is bedtime, the frog's familiar response is, "No! I'm not tired." He goes through all the usual bedtime rituals of taking a bath, putting on his pajamas, brushing his teeth, and finding his huggy (a human rag doll), all of which are hidden in the most unlikely places. Before he goes to sleep, he snacks on a bowl of flies, which makes him thirsty for a drink, which he spills. Exhausted, his mother tells him to go to sleep, but he begs for a story. Predictably, she falls asleep reading to him. The tireless amphibian gives her a hug, and finally goes to sleep, too. Sounds like "flop flop flop," "splash splash splash," and "Munch scrunch munch" will encourage children's participation, and youngsters will giggle at all the silly places Froggy searches for the things he needs before bed. Remkiewicz's bold, funny cartoons vary from several small pictures on a white background to full-spread paintings. The art echoes the text and will appeal to children. A great bedtime story.-Elizabeth O'Brien, Queens Borough Public Library, NY Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

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