Reviews for Spring Thaw


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 March 2000
Ages 5^-8. The poetic text of this picture book closely observes changes in a rural setting that point to the coming of spring: a warm wind, dripping icicles, and wagon wheels cutting ruts through snow to the mud beneath. Life quickens, too, with sap running in the maple trees and lambs burrowing in hay beside the barn. A farmer and a young boy, glimpsed earlier in the illustrations, appear at the end of the book to collect the maple syrup buckets and smile because spring has come at last. The concreteness and dignity of the text are reflected in Schuett's illustrations, which use layers of color to create lively effects of light and shadow on snow, at night and through the day. More a lyrical mood piece than a story, this picture book would be a worthwhile addition to story hours focused on the season. ((Reviewed March 1, 2000)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2000 Fall
In hushed tones, Schnur describes a rural landscape emerging from winter. From sun up till sun down on the small farm, the first signs of spring appear: a warm wind in the trees, the creaking of the old house, dripping icicles, and overflowing sap buckets. The soft edges and thick brush strokes of Schuett's paintings aptly capture the turning of the season. Copyright 2000 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 1999 December #2
Schnur (Spring, p. 382, etc.) presents spring in the New England countryside, as experienced by a farmer, his grandson, and a delightful array of woodland creatures. The thaw begins with ``a warm wind late at night, sighing through the hemlock trees'' and is fully underway with the warm yellow light of the setting sun that causes the farmer to whisper: ``Spring, Spring at last.'' Children will enjoy the glimpses of rural living: a horse and wagon, maple trees with buckets of sap, doe, raccoon, fuzzy lambs. The illustrations in blue, mauve, and gold appear to have been painted on thread-laced, handmade paper and provide a very literal interpretation of the author's poetic text, e.g., when red buds are mentioned, every bud depicted is stop-sign red. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright 2000 Kirkus Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 2000 February
PreS-Gr 3-Evocative language showcases the beginning of spring in this organic view of the natural world. The thaw "begins with a warm wind late at night, sighing through the hemlock trees" and continues through other snapshot images of nature, until finally the farmer and his son collect the buckets of sap from the maples and pause to feel the sunlight upon their faces. Schuett's captivating illustrations are the real stars here, as they shift from the deep blue of winter to the warm golden tones of spring. Various textures are incorporated into the scenes, giving them an almost tactile look. In addition, the art often offers unusual perspectives: a slanted tableau featuring empty boots indoors, a bird's-eye view of the man and the boy as they scatter crumbs for their feathered friends, and, in the end, a human's-eye view of these same people. The text provides a soothing background to this lyrical montage of images, from the raccoon peeking its nose out of its den to the tiny streams of water running from the melting rooftop snow like a "curtain of crystal beads." The book works beautifully as a mood piece and the topic makes it a must for any collection. Pair it with Reeve Lindbergh's North Country Spring (Houghton, 1997) to usher in the season.-Kathleen M. Kelly MacMillan, Carroll County Public Library, Eldersburg, MD Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

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