Reviews for Around the World in Eighty Days


Horn Book Guide Reviews 1996
Four classics are presented in a format that includes the unabridged texts, color illustrations, and copious supplemental information, such as maps, photographs, and historical explanations in the margins and on occasional double-page spreads. The information seems intended for classroom use but may impede the flow of the stories for many readers. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 1996 May
~ Around The World In Eighty Days ($23.99; $15.99 paper; May 1996; 296 pp.; 0- 670-86917-1; paper 0-670-86793-4): An entry in The Whole Story series, this is an annotated edition of the 1873 classic, printed on coated stock and enhanced by both atmospheric new paintings and hundreds of postage-stampsized 19th-century photos and prints. The explanatory captions (credited to Jean-Pierre Verdet only on the copyright page) accompanying the latter are largely superfluous, although they do add random snippets of historical background to the journey. It's the views of old ships and trains, of costumed natives, and distant ports of call--from Port Said to San Francisco--that evoke the tale's panorama of the exotic, just as the many lurid Verne trading cards and other spinoffs capture the plot's melodramatic highlights. A good way to put both book and story in context for young armchair travelers. (Fiction. 11-15) Copyright 1999 Kirkus Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 1996 July
Gr 6 Up?To most modern kids, classics may be great, worthy, even exciting stories, but they were written in and for their own times and the context can sometimes be obscure. Using the visually irresistible printing techniques popularized by the "Eyewitness" series, these two books, when prominently displayed, will probably attract more impulse readers than some of the dustier editions. But do they accomplish their stated aim? Direct textual illustration is plentiful, lively, and useful. The reproductions of prints, photographs, and maps that pepper each page and are intended to enhance readers' grasp of the times, however, are a mixed success. There is a sameness to them and an arbitrary feel to their use. Pirate buffs will find Treasure Island's variety of ship drawings, details of sailing minutiae, and photographs of pieces of eight or guns and swords quite satisfying. Verne's work is less enhanced by its graphics. This episodic travelogue would be best served by lots of clear maps with the route well marked. But the few maps shown are so small that the legends are unreadable and country and city names are blurred. Limitations aside, the initial appeal of this fresh approach may serve to attract some new readers to these enduring stories that have managed without any help for this long.?Sally Margolis, formerly at Deerfield Public Library, IL

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