Reviews for Frog Prince, Continued


Kirkus Reviews 1991 June
The co-author (with A. Wolf) of The True Story of the Three Little Pigs (1989) assays another humorous embroidery of a traditional tale with somewhat less notable success. The picture of the erstwhile frog and his princess bickering (``Stop sticking your tongue out like that''; ``How come you never want to go downto the pond anymore?'') is genuinely funny, and the prince's quest for a witch to turn him back into a frog--during which he runs into witches from several other tales--is amusing. But the conclusion--glad to get back to his princess, he kisses her and they both become happy frogs--seems limp and unmotivated. Meanwhile, Johnson's paintings, though he adopts some of Lane Smith's fey menace and induces tension by canting his perspectives, lack Smith's wit, imagination, and masterful sense of design. Still, the situation and dialogue are irreverently comical and Johnson's caricatures are adroitly satirical. It's an entertaining effort-- just not up to that superlative first book. (Picture book. 5+) Copyright 1999 Kirkus Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1991 April #4
Will Scieszka, who set the record straight in his bestselling The True Story of the Three Little Pigs , let the Frog Prince and the princess who kissed him live happily ever after? Well, maybe--but first the two must weather various marital difficulties. She hates the way he hops around on the furniture instead of slaying dragons, and he complains that she never likes to visit the pond anymore. The bug-eyed, long-tongued prince decides that he will be happy only if he becomes a frog once again, so he runs off in search of a witch to do the job. On the way, he encounters a trio of eccentric hags preoccupied with the plights of other fairy-tale characters, as well as a fairy godmother who is practicing turning various objects into carriages. Though their coloring is somewhat somber, Johnson's ( No Star Nights ; The Salamander Room ) stylized, sophisticated pictures add to the keen humor of this revisionist revelry. Ages 3-8. (May) Copyright 1991 Cahners Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1994 August #2
The fabled amphibian meets with marital discord; according to PW, ``stylized, sophisticated pictures add to the keen humor of this revisionist revelry.'' Ages 5-up. (Sept.) Copyright 1994 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 1991 May
Gr 1-5-- As in The True Story of the Three Little Pigs (Viking, 1989), Scieszka offers another tongue-in-cheek ``rest of the story,'' telling what happens after the Princess kissed the frog. Readers won't be surprised to learn that they do not live ``happily ever after.'' In fact, they're downright miserable. He misses the pond; she's tired of him sticking out his tongue and hopping on the furniture. In desperation, the bug-eyed hero decides to find a witch who can turn him back into the happy frog he once was. Successfully surviving encounters with several sinister but dimwitted witches from other tales, he finally meets Cinderella's Fairy Godmother who tries to help, but the transformation is definitely NOT what he had in mind. As the clock strikes midnight, he returns to human form and hurries home to his beloved Princess where the tale ends unexpectedly, but indeed happily. Johnson's surreal illustrations are right on target for the offbeat story. Painted in deep, shadowy colors and expertly composed, they are filled with subtle and surprising humor that continually rewards viewers with laugh-out-loud visual treats. The overall design is clean and spacious, with figures and objects moving past the ragged borders of the pictures and across the pages, matching the verbal movement perfectly. Readers will relish the pleasure inherent in combining traditional fairy tale motifs with modern, everyday objects and actions. A winner.-- Linda Boyles, Alachua County Library District, Gainesville, FL Copyright 1991 Cahners Business Information.

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