Reviews for Gorilla Doctors : Saving Endangered Great Apes


Booklist Reviews 2005 June #1
Gr. 3-5. Veterinarians in east central Africa who "make house calls--or rather, forest calls" to mountain gorillas are the focus of this entry in the excellent Scientists in the Field series. In each chapter a dramatic, present-tense recounting of a real incident, such as an expedition to disentangle a gorilla from an antelope snare, leads into a discussion of some aspect of Homo sapiens' relationship with Gorilla beringei beringei, emphasizing that threats to the endangered primates come "not just from bullets, spears, or snares, but also from diseases that might have come from humans." Although the photos are of inconsistent quality, the best capture the rugged, unconventional aspects of the work (such as collecting fecal samples) alongside appealing glimpses of vets cuddling an orphaned baby ape. The featured scientists are an unusually diverse group, including black Africans and white Americans, women and men. Turner, the author of Hachiko (2004), is donating half the book's royalties to the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project. ((Reviewed June 1 & 15, 2005)) Copyright 2005 Booklist Reviews.

----------------------
Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Fall
Working in the post-Dian Fossey era, the veterinarians of the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project work to bolster the health of the gorilla population in Rwanda and Uganda and mitigate the consequences of close human contact. Excellent photographs prominently feature the scientists at work (predominantly women and people of color in scientific roles) as well as photogenic gorillas. Reading list. Ind. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

----------------------
Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2005 #4
The latest entries in the first-rate Scientists in the Field series put conservation front and center, focusing on the efforts of scientists to reverse the damage done by humans to, respectively, American prairies and African mountain gorillas. In both cases, it is the expansion of farming that has reduced native habitats and introduced nonnative species and diseases. In Prairie Builders, Collard traces the decades-long development and monitoring of the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Iowa, an ambitious attempt to reclaim farmland and return it to the tallgrass prairie it once was. The account features biologists Pauline Drobney and Diane Debinski as they work year after year to redevelop the prairie, even without fully knowing the complexities of the original ecosystem. In Gorilla Doctors, management of the mountain gorilla population involves the practice of conservation medicine. Working in the post-Dian Fossey era, the veterinarians of the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project work to bolster the health of the gorilla population in Rwanda and Uganda and mitigate the consequences of close human contact. In both books excellent photographs prominently feature the scientists at work (predominantly women and people of color in scientific roles) as well as the photogenic gorillas and the sweeping vistas of the prairie in midsummer. The portrayal of a range of occupations with varying training requirements provides appealing choices for children thinking of future careers in science and conservation. Prairie Builders has a glossary; both books have indexes and lists of recommended reading. [Review covers these titles: The Prairie Builders: Reconstructing America's Lost Grasslands and Gorilla Doctors: Saving Endangered Great Apes] Copyright 2005 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

----------------------
Kirkus Reviews 2005 May #1
What to do when the wild gorilla has the flu? Time to send for a field veterinarian like Dr. Felicia Nutter of Rwanda's Mountain Gorilla Project. This vet makes jungle calls, tracking down and treating the ailing gorilla in the wild. Long endangered because of poachers, rare gorillas of Rwanda are now even more endangered from diseases contracted from humans and other animals. This title in the Scientists in the Field series introduces a new breed of field veterinarians, epidemiologists and public-health workers, meeting the challenge with up-to-date technology and dedication. The author, who has a degree in public health, is especially successful in explaining how improving community public health benefits both gorillas and humans. Spectacular and appealing photos of gorillas, scientists and the Rwanda Preserve add even more appeal. An outstanding science nature title. (resources, web sites, photo credits, index) (Nonfiction. 10+) Copyright Kirkus 2005 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

----------------------
Library Media Connection - February 2006
Written in picture book format, this informative book covers the history of the mountain gorillas of central Africa, their plight for survival, and the important role humans are playing in their near demise and eventual comeback. Pioneer researchers George Shaller and Dian Fossey learned to live among them to learn their ways, and did their best to educate locals to prevent the extinction of the gorillas due to poaching and loss of habitat. Because of the close genetic similarities between humans and gorillas, they are very susceptible to the pathogens to which humans have developed immunity. Illustrated with color close-up photographs of the gorillas and the doctors from the Morris Foundation Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project who care for them, this book clearly provides the background and details about the gorillas and their treatment. Terminology is defined in context and the short chapters alternate between factual information and stories of apes being treated and saved. This would be an excellent book to keep in the collection alongside the research books on gorillas and as a follow up to Fossey's Gorillas in the Mist (Houghton Mifflin, 1983). The book includes a "Doing Your Part" section, which emphasizes that half of the profits from the sale of the book will be donated to the MGVA. Book and Web site resources are included. Index. Highly Recommended. Anna Hartle, Integrated Technology Teacher/Librarian, Cincinnati (Ohio) Country Day School © 2006 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

----------------------
School Library Journal Reviews 2005 July
Gr 5-8-Turner introduces the work of the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project (MGVP) as a group of scientists attempts to save endangered animals in Rwanda and Uganda. The readable text records their efforts to treat the great apes in the field as they encounter poachers, meet with loss of habitat, and face their newest threat: human diseases that can cross species lines. The author follows the team as its members go about their demanding work, foster an orphaned baby gorilla, and visit local schools and villages to explain the creatures' endangered status, and to promote positive reactions to their needs. The whole is accompanied by striking, full-color photographs and includes a list of other resources, a postscript, and an index.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

----------------------