Reviews for Josie to the Rescue


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 May 1999
Gr. 3^-4, younger for reading aloud. When second-grader Josie overhears her parents discussing financial concerns, she decides to do something helpful for them. She attempts to supplement the family's food supply by planting dandelions, mistakenly uprooting her mother's tulip bulbs in the process. Later, she concocts a scheme to get free diapers for her soon-to-be-born baby sister, and she investigates her neighbors in order to win a contest for a free baby stroller. Predictably, all her efforts come to naught, and she is particularly perturbed that her cousin Mary Jane always seems to succeed when she herself fails. Short chapters, large print, and a breezy style make this an appealing choice. Singer handles Josie's misunderstandings with humor and sensitivity that young readers are sure to appreciate. To be illustrated in black and white by S. D. Schindler. ((Reviewed May 1, 1999)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 1999 March #2
Second-grader Josie, with a new baby sibling, finds out that her parents are having financial troubles; she wants to help by coming up with an idea so ``wonderful, fabulous, terrific'' that it will not only solve their problems, but prove once and for all that she's a more helpful girl than her cousin and rival, Mary Jane. And Josie doesn't lack for ideas. In quick succession she plants a vegetable garden so that her folks won't have to spend money on greens, writes a bogus letter of complaint in an effort to get free goods, and attempts to win a contest for a baby stroller. In this gently humorous tale from Singer (Stay True, 1998, etc.), all Josie's efforts backfire. She ruins her mother's flower garden by mistaking tulip bulbs for onions, gets chided for dishonesty when a diaper company responds to her fraudulent letter by sending her a truckload of disposables, and loses the stroller contest. The story culminates in a satisfying fashion; Josie learns several predictable but important life lessons. It's sweet and smooth, with the rivalry between Josie and Mary Jane spicing up the plot. (Fiction book. 6-9) Copyright 1999 Kirkus Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1999 January #4
This chapter book takes the third-person point-of-view of eight-year-old Josie, who, after overhearing her parents' money worries as the birth of a new sibling approaches, decides to help them out. As Josie struggles to be as "helpful" as her perfect cousin and rival Mary Jane, her good intentions go awry: she plants dandelion seeds in her mother's flower bed (convinced that their leaves will yield "lettuce" for a nutritious salad, she calls them "lettelion" seeds), unearths her mother's tulip bulbs, which she mistakes for onions, and her grand scheme to wrangle free diapers backfires. Singer's cast of grade schoolers is upbeat and their banter is lively, but the prevailing humor sticks to well-worn subjects like bathroom tissue and diapers. Josie finds something to laugh about at even her darkest and most embarrassing moments, yet her voice occasionally slips out of character (e.g., describing a classmate, the protagonist comments, "She was what Josie's mom called a `space cadet' "). The changing relationship between Josie and her mother is the book's real strength, and their eventual understanding of one another provides the book's tidy, if predictable, conclusion. Ages 6-9. (Mar.) Copyright 1999 Publishers Weekly Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 1999 June
Gr 2-4Josie Jellico is a lively second grader who prides herself on being helpful. She is looking forward to a new sibling until she overhears her mothers concerns about money. Josie decides to do something to help while showing up her snotty cousin Mary Jane at the same time. With the assistance of her flamboyant friend Flora, she comes up with some ill-fated plans that include writing letters of complaint to a diaper company hoping to get free samples and entering a contest to win a stroller. Along the way, Josie faces some hard truths about her methods, but feels better after a talk with her mother, who shares some of her competitive feelings and tells how she deals with them. Throughout, the girl comes across as a fully drawn, likable character who gets carried away by the powerful combination of laudable goals and feelings of jealousy. Singers excellent characterization extends to the minor figures, who stand out as distinct individuals. In addition, the authors heavy reliance on dialogue peppered with short descriptive passages makes readers feel a part of Josies warm family and her boisterous class. Only one small detail mars the credibility of the smoothly flowing plot; its hard to believe any company could accept the handwriting of second graders as that of adults. Beginning chapter-book readers will find that the wide margins, large print, and full-page line drawings enhance their enjoyment of this story.Maggie McEwen, Coffin Elementary School, Brunswick, ME Copyright 1999 School Library Journal Reviews

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