Reviews for It Came from Ohio! : My Life As a Writer


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 August 1997
Gr. 4^-6. The Stephen King of children's books spills his guts at last in this as-told-to memoir, taking stabs at finding the high spots in a deceptively uneventful childhood and stints at a college humor magazine and specialty periodicals, all of which prepared him to launch his eye-poppingly successful Fear Street and Goosebumps series. Festooned with exclamation points and one-liners, his genial narrative reads like an extended version of a typical author's talk; influenced by radio, TV, comic books, and science fiction, he began creating homemade magazines at an early age, graduated at 12 to novels, and after college held a succession of jobs, including substitute teacher: "the scariest thing I ever did." Although he keeps his income under wraps, he is open about his family, work habits, and storytelling techniques; quotes fan mail; and thanks editors and coworkers; then closes by advising young writers to "read, read, read." Muddily reproduced black-and-white portraits ("Me, age eight--scary!") and hilarious pages from hand-drawn early efforts further humanize this outrageously prolific, horribly entertaining author. ((Reviewed Aug. 1997)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 1997
The staggeringly popular author shares his life as a self-avowed shy person, his writing secrets, and the bumps (and 'Bumps!) in his career in this fast-paced, light autobiography related with attractively understated candor. Grayish family snapshots supply an element of concrete reality for readers who may have some doubt that R. L. Stine is a real person. Appended is a compilation of the twenty questions most asked of the author and his answers. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 1997 #4
The staggeringly popular author shares his life as a self-avowed shy person, his writing secrets, and the bumps (and 'Bumps!) in his career in this light autobiography related with attractively understated candor. The fast-paced text is straightforward with little deviation from strict chronology, and the book is illustrated with grayish family snapshots that supply an element of concrete reality for readers who may have some doubt that R. L. Stine is a real person. Appended is a compilation of the twenty questions most asked of the author and his answers; librarians will love the answer to number twenty. Although Stine credits Joe Arthur as the book's co-author, the eye-catching now-you-see-it-now-you-don't image on the cover may contribute some clues as to who the author's real collaborators are. e.s.w. Copyright 1999 Horn Book Magazine Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 1997 July
Gr 4-7?In this entertaining autobiography, the prolific author of horror books talks about his childhood, his dreams of becoming a writer, and his eventual success with the "Fear Street" and "Goosebumps" series. As autobiographies go, this one isn't especially dramatic, but Stine tells his story with both humor and verve. Readers get the idea that he genuinely loves his work and sincerely cares for his audience. This book is written in the same conversational tone as his fictional books. Black-and-white photos of the author, his family, and friends, as well as some of the cartoons he did as a young man, are sprinkled throughout. Also included is a list of the 20 questions most often asked by children (and the answers), a feature that should make report writing a bit easier for this author's many fans.?Melissa Hudak, North Suburban District Library, Roscoe, IL

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