Reviews for How Do Dinosaurs Say Good Night?


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 April 2000
/*Starred Review*/ Ages 4^-6. The text is sweet and simple--just right for the wonderful pictures that really make this picture book special. Teague's art takes dinosaurs out of their usual context and plops them into bed (a rather comical fit) for a sleepy-time tale with a difference. Endpapers introduce the critter cast in all their gorgeous glory: tyrannosaurus rex, dimetrodon, and more, in vivid, yet still earthbound colors. Prima donna dinos, they yawn and fuss and throw toys about, procrastinating (just like real kids) any way they can as human Moms and Dads, ready to put "baby" to bed, look on in various stages of impatience, anger, and surprise. The whimsical expressions on the "children's" faces give solid clues to the joke. By cleverly varying his perspectives, Teague adds dramatic punch to the pictures--readers watch from above as one behemoth baby whips its neck from side to side; they watch from below when another stamps its huge feet; and they're face to face with one snoozing T-rex hugging its teddy bear close. Alert lookers will notice the dino's name incorporated somewhere into each picture--pteranodon is neatly spelled out in blocks on the floor. A delight from start to finish; better buy more than one. ((Reviewed April 1, 2000)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2000 Fall
""Does a dinosaur stomp his feet on the floor"" when Papa and Mama announce that it's bedtime? No, dinosaur children are perfectly behaved when they say good night. Readers, however, will recognize the temper tantrum and stalling antics described in this rhyming bedtime story. The lively perspectives in the colorful full-bleed illustrations show different kinds of dinosaurs responding to their human parents. Copyright 2000 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 2000 April #1
Huge, fanciful dinosaurs confront their parents at bedtime in this playful romp. How does a dinosaur act when Papa comes in to say it's bedtime? "Does he slam his tail and pout? Does he throw his teddy bear all about?" Teague's paintings tell the story. First the father appears at the child's door and reacts with surprise, or anger, or shock to each described behavior. Then, the mothers take over. Of course, dinosaurs don't really act that way. They turn off the light, go quietly to bed, and give extra hugs and kisses to their parents. Teague's humorous, detailed, and colorful paintings give the context to Yolen's simple verse. Each huge dinosaur lives in a child's bedroom surrounded by familiar toys, books, and pets that sometimes bear the brunt of the dinosaur's temper. One fearful dog wraps his body around the bedpost when his Trachodon shouts for one more book. Dinosaurs tower over their bemused, bewildered, or distressed ethnically diverse parents who range in age from young to middle aged, just as in real life! After they learn the names of each of the species pictured on the endpapers, children may enjoy finding their names hidden in the illustrations each time a new species is introduced. Verse and illustration are beautifully matched in these bedtime scenarios familiar to all parents of young children. (Picture book. 3-7) Copyright 2000 Kirkus Reviews Little ones know that Grandma's house is best! A mouse, a frog, a mole, a snake, a duck, and a spider tippity toe, hipppity hop, diggity dig, slithery slee, and scritchity scratch as they creep and dig, dash and free-fall on their way to Grandma's house. Three rhymed lines and a refrain introduce each animal. Then, a cumulative verse, repeating only the action words, brings each animal into the picture one at a time until they are all cavorting pell-mell through the pages. Yolen's verse is occasionally vivid, but some of the adjectives and verbs she uses for rhymes are contrived. Molk's subdued watercolor illustrations are playful, graceful and gentle. Many have interesting details that draw the eye deeply into the picture. Spider webs in unexpected places, insects, imperfections in reeds, and lichens on logs increase the pictorial interest in the quiet two-page spreads and round out the action in the livelier ones. Without these pictures, the telling might still be engaging, but they are what set it above the ordinary. Pick this up, lickety split. (Picture book. 2-6) Copyright 2000 Kirkus Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2000 April #4
Set to a lilting bedtime beat, this rollicking rumpus of a tale ups the humor ante in a familiar scenario by substituting dinosaurs for children: "How does a dinosaur say good night when Papa comes in to turn off the light?" In a series of snappy lines, Yolen (Off We Go!, reviewed above; Queen's Own Fool, reviewed below) highlights a variety of postponement antics, some familiar (moping, sulking and demanding "one book more!"), some of a distinctly dinosaur variety "Does a dinosaur slam his tail and pout? Does he throw his teddy bear all about?" Teague makes hay with the text, and as always his illustrations are a flurry of sly madcap inspiration. He chooses the winged Pteranodon (spelled out in ABC blocks on the bedroom floor) as the character who throws his teddy bear while flying about the room; for "Does he swing his neck from side to side" it's the snake-headed Apatosaurus who does the swinging. Under his sure direction, the sight gag never grows stale, and the sight of a T-Rex puckering up for a kiss, or an enormous Stegosaurus crammed into a tiny bed and daintily turning off the light switch with the tip of his tail, is sure to elicit giggles. As the endpapers reveal, there's a cast of 10 dinosaurs featured here, and sharp eyes will enjoy spotting their proper names tucked into each illustration. This rib-tickling bedtime fare packs plenty of appeal. Ages 2-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2000 June
PreS-K-A rhyming, moral read-it-again tale. "How does a dinosaur say good night when Papa comes in to turn off the light?/Does a dinosaur slam his tail and pout?" Teague's wonderful rounded illustrations show 10 dinosaur species (all identified) as they settle down for the night in their human households. "Does a dinosaur stomp his feet on the floor/and shout: `I want to hear one book more?'" After demonstrating a variety of bad bedtime behaviors, the reptiles are then shown to be model youngsters. "They give a big hug, then give one kiss more." While the message is a little obvious, it is impossible to resist Teague's endearing dinos.-Kathleen Whalin, Greenwich Country Day School, CT Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

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