Reviews for I Have a Dream


Booklist Monthly Selections - #2 February 1998
/*Starred Review*/ Gr. 4^-8. Every year when Dr. King's birthday rolls around and during Black History month, short clips from the "I Have a Dream" speech are played and replayed--always the same few sentences presented together with grainy black-and-white images. This new book, which beautifully evokes feelings of hope as well as despair, not only gives readers the opportunity to experience the eloquent speech in its entirety but also to see it anew through the eyes of 15 African American artists who have won the Coretta Scott King Award or received a Coretta Scott King honor book designation. Each artist depicts a portion of the story of the civil rights movement or his or her vision of the meaning of a section of the speech, thus bringing new perspective to Dr. King's words. On the jacket painting, by Leo and Diane Dillon, Dr. King, who is looking toward the sun, stands next to figures holding scales and a gavel, representing equality and justice; King's words about suffering and police brutality are illustrated by Tom Feelings' depiction of a woman covering her eyes in sorrow; and James Ransome shows African Americans and whites together at a long picnic table, the "table of brotherhood." A foreword by Coretta Scott King, a brief biography of Dr. King, and notes from the artists about their contributions round out the book, which clearly reminds us why the rolling, powerful text remains one of the landmarks of American political writing. ((Reviewed February 15, 1998)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 1998
Illustrated by fifteen Coretta Scott King Award and Honor Book artists. Foreword by Coretta Scott King. The artwork in different styles and media invites readers to savor the richness of King's powerful speech. Most of the full-page illustrations, captioned with phrases from the speech, portray scenes from the civil rights movement. A brief biography of Dr. King and notes by each of the illustrators enhance the text. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1997 November #2
King's most famous speech is handsomely interpreted in this lavish volume, which pairs his stirring words with illustrations by 15 Coretta Scott King Award- or Honor-winning artists. Taking as their inspiration King's timeless message, delivered at the famous March on Washington in the summer of 1963, the artists weigh in with an eclectic exhibit that, thanks largely to a simple but elegant book design, succeeds as a unified whole. Whether the medium is Leo and Diane Dillon's subtly plied acrylics, Ashley Bryan's playful tempera and gouaches or Brian Pinkney's distinctive scratchboard and watercolors, whether the scene depicts the "unspeakable horrors of police brutality," the degradation heaped upon those engaged in passive resistance or a symbolic feast at the "table of brotherhood," the pages flow like shifting set designs, each one illuminating a segment of King's speech. The result is an uplifting glimpse at a pivotal moment in 20th-century history, the impact made more personal by the different artists' heartfelt interpretations. A thumbnail biography of King is included, along with a brief afterword by each artist describing symbolic elements in his or her illustration. All ages. (Nov.) Copyright 1998 Publishers Weekly Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 1997 November
K Up Martin Luther King, Jr.'s classic speech is creatively illustrated by 15 Coretta Scott King Award-winning artists. Signed statements from the artists explain the emotions they were tying to capture and why and how they used certain colors and tones. The size and medium of the original art are given. This book evokes the sound of King's voice as it was captured on that historic August day in 1963. Although some pictures are more touching and sobering than others, from cover to cover this is a beautiful book. A foreword by Coretta Scott King is included. A biographical sketch, preceded by a black-and-white photograph, highlights critical events in Martin Luther King, Jr.'s life. Marie Wright, University Library, Indianapolis, IN Copyright 1998 School Library Journal Reviews

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