Reviews for Tale of Pip And Squeak


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
Two mouse brothers live at opposite ends of their shared house, each claiming that his brother's interests clash irreconcilably with his own. But when they cooperate instead of competing in hosting a party, the affair outshines their previous efforts. Duke's cheerful watercolors (depicting familiar objects as used by mice) are more fun than her belabored message. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
Two mouse brothers live at opposite ends of their shared house, each claiming that his brother's interests clash irreconcilably with his own. But when they cooperate instead of competing in hosting a party, the affair outshines their previous efforts. Duke's cheerful watercolors (depicting familiar objects as used by mice) are more fun than her belabored message. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2007 March #1
Duke offers a gentle lesson starring two brothers, Pip and Squeak. Pip is a painter, Squeak is a singer, and they have a typical sibling rivalry: Neither appreciates the talent of the other. They are unable to work together on anything except the big party they host once a year. This year, Squeak writes the longest song he has every written and Pip paints the largest pictures he has ever painted. With both wanting to be the star of the party, trouble ensues and the brothers make an utter mess in their freshly cleaned house. With only one day before the big party, they work together and devise a plan that will allow both to display their talents. Duke's detailed illustrations convey the uniqueness of the brothers. Her use of ordinary household objects to create their world is captivating. Hairpins and bottle caps turn into chairs, and memo slips become window blinds; the illustrations resemble a world a child would create. A mix of watercolors and acrylics create a playful, lively environment for the reader to enjoy while learning about compromise. (Picture book. 3-7) Copyright Kirkus 2007 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2007 April #4

D uke's (Aunt Isabel Tells a Good One ) nimble narrative features plenty of peppy dialogue, yet the true charm of this tale is rooted in her whimsically detailed illustrations, rendered in watercolor, acrylic, pen and gouache. They depict a bustling mouse enclave in an attic, where the diminutive residents make merry use of abandoned items: a dressmaker's dummy is a climbing wall; a Mets baseball cap with the words "Opera House" taped to it sits atop an old-fashioned radio; and tiny cups hang from a tricycle's spokes in a makeshift Ferris wheel. Two mice brothers live in a home consisting of a shoebox flanked by two towers, one fashioned from a "Tinka Toys" box, the other from two "Clay-doh" containers. The former houses the studio of artist Pip; the latter the music room of songwriter and singer Squeak. The bickering brothers keep their distance, Pip complaining that the sound of Squeak's singing hurts his ears and Squeak insisting the smell of Pip's paint makes him cough so much "it was a miracle he could utter a note." Preparing for their annual party, at which Squeak aspires to sing his longest song ever and Pip to display his biggest pictures ever, the overly competitive siblings get into a tussle that suddenly (and rather inexplicably) becomes a jolly free-for-all that leaves their party room in shambles. The two cooperate to clean up the mess and stage their best-ever musical and art performance. As readers happily pore over the art's comical particulars, they will easily grasp the worthwhile message of this buoyant caper. Ages 3-up. (Apr.)

[Page 50]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2007 May

PreS-Gr 2 -Two mice brothers have nothing in common except for their mutual dislike. Pip the painter is distracted by Squeak's singing, and Squeak can't stand the smell of his sibling's paints. They live in opposite sides of a large house and avoid crossing paths whenever possible. At their annual party, each brother presents his work to his friends while the other refuses to participate. One year, their efforts to outdo each other culminate in such a disaster that they find themselves working together to recover it. In the process, they reconcile their differences and throw the best party ever. The watercolor illustrations are filled with witty and whimsical details of small mice living among full-size human objects. A tricycle tire becomes a Ferris wheel, and a Chapstick tube is the post at the end of a banister. The writing is clear and clever. "Chairs tipped, pictures flipped, music ripped. 'EEK!' Squeak squawked. 'YEEK!' Pip yipped." The lyricism of the text will make this a satisfying read-aloud, and the clever details in the art make it a satisfying read-alone.-Amelia Jenkins, Juneau Public Library, AK

[Page 90]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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