Reviews for Cat Who Went to Paris


Kirkus Reviews 1991 July
The humorous and touching memoirs of a man and his cat--a Scottish Fold named Norton who travels everywhere, especially deep into this reformed cat-hater's heart. When Gethers--publisher (Villard books), novelist (Getting Blue, 1987, etc.), and screen-writer--receives Norton as a present from a girlfriend, he's less than enthusiastic--but not for long. Though the girlfriend eventually goes by the wayside, Gethers and the cat fast become pals. Soon the highly personable puss is accompanying the not-quite-as-personable Gethers everywhere--to parties, Fire Island vacations, and business trips abroad (to work on screenplays with Roman Polanski)--and making friends with everyone from flight attendants to hotel managers. (Norton goes on beach walks with Gethers, romps around on Parisian rooftops, and generally leads as daring and worldly a life as is possible for a house pet.) Finally, after a series of failed human relationships, Gethers finds his true love, Janis, who takes years of convincing- -from human and feline (Norton is smitten with her, too)--that this is the real thing. After a happy/sad recounting of the death of Gethers's father, there's an upbeat ending: Gethers, Janis, and Norton settle into a cozy old house on Long Island. Aside from some repetition--Norton does many of the same endearing things wherever he goes--a charming and heartening account. (Line drawings.) Copyright 1999 Kirkus Reviews

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Library Journal Reviews 1991 August #1
Librarians have already been charmed by Scottish fold cats via those literary trademark kitties, Baker and Taylor. Now the reading public is about to be introduced to the ``folds.'' Gethers, a book publisher, is your typical cat hater who had a conversion after receiving Norton. Norton enjoys everything the average cat disdains--riding in a car, airplane, boat; walking on the beach; and interacting with strangers. Gethers's almost excessive devotion to Norton may puzzle some readers, but most cat lovers will be entertained by the gregarious antics of globe-trotting, party-animal Norton. Comparison will be made to Cleveland Amory's Cat Who Came for Christmas ( LJ 10/1/87), but Gethers has a more contemporary lifestyle and writing style. Cat lovers at public libraries will demand this title, and as librarians we need to share our own infatuation with Scottish folds with our readers. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/91.-- Eva Lautemann, DeKalb Coll. Lib., Clarkston, Ga. Copyright 1991 Cahners Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1991 June #4
Gethers, publisher of Villard Books, was an aileurophobe until he met the six-week-old Scottish Fold kitten, a gift from his friend Cindy. He capitulated immediately. From the beginning Norton exhibited extraordinary aplomb no matter where he was, or in whose company; he was sensitive, intelligent and always aware of what was happening. Norton accompanied Gethers everywhere--to the office, to parties, on business trips to Los Angeles and Paris, on weekends to Fire Island; hotel staff and airline personnel were eager to serve him. Like Cleveland Amory's cat, Polar Bear, Norton became a social arbiter who influenced his owner's love life. What a pet. What a tale. Illustrated. BOMC selection. (Sept.) Copyright 1991 Cahners Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1992 October #2
Gethers was an aileurophobe until he met kitten Norton, who turned out to be a very special pet indeed. A BOMC selection in cloth. Illustrated. ( Nov. ) Copyright 1992 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 1992 February
t owners tell of their talented animals in relaxed, entertaining ways. Gethers's style is extremely light and at times funny as he tells how Norton taught him to like cats, how easily this feline made friends with airline crews, explored Parisian rooftops, and stood vigil at the death of his owner's father. Blind actor-musician Tom Sullivan relates, through White, how he had to let Dinah train him as she was so much more capable than his previous guide dog. Chapters of Gethers's book open with appealing line-drawing caricatures; the photographs in Leading Lady appear in a centerfold. Animal lovers are sure to enjoy these stories of almost unbelievably skilled pets. --Claudia Moore, W. T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA Copyright 1992 Cahners Business Information.

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