Reviews for Kill Order


Booklist Reviews 2012 September #2
Though Dashner wrapped up his best-selling Maze Runner trilogy with 2011's The Death Cure, he returns to the well with this prequel, telling the backstory of how the world's population came to be infected with the psychotic lunacy disease that would lead scientists to put teens through a series of sadistic tests in the name of finding a cure. We meet Mark and Trina soon after ravenous sun flares wipe out a good swath of humanity, living tooth and nail in a small settlement until a gang of hazmat-suited folks drop from the sky and shoot everyone up with virus-laden darts. The quest to find answers and save their band of friends takes them straight into a bleak heart of darkness. The story's burdened by thin characters, plot contrivances, and generally tortured logic, but the series' many readers aren't in it for the craft. The draw is the gobs of gruesome violence and raving lunacy in the back-to-back, extended action sequences. And there's plenty such fare here, even if it all feels like the stakes are lowered a bit by knowing the inevitable outcome. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2013 Fall
Set about a year after the sun flares that destroyed the world, this prequel to The Maze Runner trilogy explains the origins of the deadly Flare virus and the discovery of the first Immune. It doesn't stand alone, but fans of the series will appreciate this fast-paced addition to the canon, as will die-hard post-apocalyptic readers who can overlook the plot's tedium.

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Kirkus Reviews 2012 August #1
A prequel to the series that began with The Maze Runner (2009) takes readers back to the moment when the sun flares devastate the Earth and tells the story of the birth of the killer virus that followed. Mark and Trina were riding the New York City subtrans system when the flares originally struck. Glad to have each other, they were very lucky to meet up with Alec and Lana, both ex-military and equipped with plenty of survival skills. It has taken them a year to get to relative safety in the Appalachian Mountains and to establish a settlement with other survivors. Life is beginning to resemble "normal," when they are once again attacked from the sky, this time by soldiers. The situation worsens when survivors begin to sicken and die, but not before going mad. The small group makes its way back out into the forest, hunting for their attackers and looking for answers. It's only a matter of time before one of them, infected, goes insaneā€¦.Blending past, present and future, this is a gritty and unnerving look at a post-apocalyptic world that both recalls early classics of the genre and looks forward to Dashner's already-established trilogy. For fans of the original books and of the genre as a whole, a must read. (Science fiction/thriller 12 & up) Copyright Kirkus 2012 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2012 August #3

This prequel to Dashner's dystopian Maze Runner trilogy, set 13 years before those books,focuses on a new character--Mark--who lives through the "sun flares" that decimate Earth. He creates a new family with other survivors, including Alec, a tough old soldier, and Trina, his love interest. But then strangers arrive on an airship and infect villagers with a mysterious virus, which quickly spreads and mutates. Maze Runner fans may be surprised by the new protagonist, but they will be swept up in the breathless, cinematic action. Whether Mark is flashing back to his escape from the sun flares, stealing an airship with Alec, or battling hordes of virus-infected maniacs, Dashner's adventure is filled with near-constant melees and peril (some readers might want to trade some fight scenes for more narrative and character development). Even so, Dashner has crafted a clever prequel that will appeal to fans anxious to see where The Maze Runner came from, while enticing those unfamiliar with the later books. Ages 12-up. Agent: Michael Bourret, Dystel & Goderich Literary Management. (Aug.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

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Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

This prequel to Dashner's dystopian Maze Runner trilogy, set 13 years before those books,focuses on a new character--Mark--who lives through the "sun flares" that decimate Earth. He creates a new family with other survivors, including Alec, a tough old soldier, and Trina, his love interest. But then strangers arrive on an airship and infect villagers with a mysterious virus, which quickly spreads and mutates. Maze Runner fans may be surprised by the new protagonist, but they will be swept up in the breathless, cinematic action. Whether Mark is flashing back to his escape from the sun flares, stealing an airship with Alec, or battling hordes of virus-infected maniacs, Dashner's adventure is filled with near-constant melees and peril (some readers might want to trade some fight scenes for more narrative and character development). Even so, Dashner has crafted a clever prequel that will appeal to fans anxious to see where The Maze Runner came from, while enticing those unfamiliar with the later books. Ages 12-up. Agent: Michael Bourret, Dystel & Goderich Literary Management. (Aug.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

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School Library Journal Reviews 2012 November

Gr 7 Up--The return of plants and animals to a land ravaged by sun flares is finally giving the humans reason to have hope for the future. Mark and Alec are just heading out to hunt when an airship approaches their primitive village, hovering overhead while its crew shoots darts into the inhabitants. The pair manages to capture the airship and discover that the darts are infecting the villagers with a highly contagious virus. Some inhabitants die immediately, while others suffer a long, agonizing death. Mark and Alec, along with their cohorts, set out to find and stop whoever is responsible. They discover that other villages have been infected, and that the virus is mutating, causing widespread madness. They find a five-year-old girl who has been shot with a dart, but doesn't show any signs of illness. As each of them begins to succumb to the virus, the significance of the little girl's immunity becomes apparent. Realizing that it's too late to stop the spread of the virus, and believing that the child is the last hope for human survival, Mark and Alec are determined to get her to safety. Throughout the story, flashbacks describe what happened when the sun flares hit and the horror of the days following the disaster. This prequel (Delacorte, 2012) to James Dashner's "Maze Runner" trilogy, is narrated by Mark Deakins, who does an excellent job of keeping the tension high, switching seamlessly between the new cast of characters.-Cary Frostick, Mary Riley Styles Public Library, Falls Church, VA

[Page 59]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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VOYA Reviews 2012 December
Thirteen years before the events of The Maze Runner (Delacorte, 2009/VOYA December 2009) and only a year after sun flares have caused a global environmental catastrophe, a small group of survivors, led by an ex-soldier named Alec and a teenager named Mark, is just beginning to put their lives back together when they are attacked by a strangely well-equipped force calling themselves the PFC, and shot with a mysterious serum. In their attempt to discover the reason for the attack, Mark and Alec soon learn that their friends have been injected with a deadly virus dubbed "The Flare." Meanwhile, two members of Mark and Alec's group, and a young girl who appears to be immune to The Flare, are kidnapped by the PFC. Most of the novel is taken up by countless action sequences (set off by cringe-inducing dialogue) as Mark and Alec fight off the PFC, save their friends, and learn the reason The Flare has been released, a reason as incoherent as it is obvious even to readers who have not read The Death Cure (Delacorte, 2011/VOYA December 2011). What makes this novel so infuriating is that interwoven within this main plot are far-too-brief flashbacks to the much more interesting story of the first days of the sun flares. This plot by itself would have made a far more promising novel. Instead we are left with a prequel that only die-hard fans of the Maze Runner trilogy will love.--Mark Flowers 2Q 4P J S Copyright 2011 Voya Reviews.

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