Reviews for Three Little Fish and the Big Bad Shark


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
Three little fish set out to make homes of their own, but a seaweed house and a sandcastle are no match for the big bad shark. The third choice--a sunken ship--is impossible to crunch through and renders the predator toothless. This undersea take on the Three Little Pigs is overly busy but features vivid cartoon illustrations. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
Three little fish set out to make homes of their own, but a seaweed house and a sandcastle are no match for the big bad shark. The third choice--a sunken ship--is impossible to crunch through and renders the predator toothless. This undersea take on the Three Little Pigs is overly busy but features vivid cartoon illustrations. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2007 April #1
This aquatic update on the classic pig story is sure to enthrall readers young and old. When Jim, Tim and Kim set out to make their own homes in the sea, each builds with a different material. Jim's seaweed house quickly succumbs to the jaws of the Big Bad Shark, as does the sand house of his brother, Tim. Both narrowly escape to the safety of their sister Kim's house--a sunken ship. A surprise ending will delight those cheering on the piscine trio. Geist's text is close enough to the original to be familiar, yet original enough to be enjoyable, especially when it comes to the beloved refrains: "Not by the skin of my finny fin fin." Gorton's digital illustrations are bright blocks of color and shape, and the facial expressions lend much to the tale. Great for educators teaching comparisons, and for ocean lovers. (Picture book. 3-8) Copyright Kirkus 2007 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.

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Library Media Connection - October 2007
This story is a variant of the "Three Little Pigs," and it works wonderfully. A big, bad shark threatens to eat each house constructed by each of the three little fish, and each fish defies him with, "Not by the skin of my finny, fin, fin." What makes this an effective version of the familiar tale is the bright colors, large depictions of the characters, and dynamic text that changes and moves with the story and its emphasis. The reader is put into the story as it happens. It's very much an action-packed story in which the sister fish chooses wisely and the bad guy can't get the best of her. The story ends with the toothless shark eating greens from a bowl. Recommended. Anne Hanson, Library Media Specialist, Hoover Elementary School, North Mankato, Minnesota © 2007 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2007 June

PreS-Gr 1-- The tale of "The Three Little Pigs" gets an underwater makeover in this snappy yarn. Three little fish swim out into the deep blue sea to build their homes. Jim builds a "weedy little house," Tim builds a "sandy little house," and Kim takes up residence in a sunken ship. It isn't long before the big bad shark shows up at each successive residence, calling "Little fish, little fish, let me come in!" Children will quickly join in the answering refrain, "Not by the skin of my finny fin fin!" Gorton's whimsical, computer-drawn scenery and electric color palette set just the right tone for Geist's tongue-in-cheek retelling. The bold font is humorously integrated with the art, appearing inside the shark's mouth for emphasis, or swirling along the current with an escaping fish. This spunky tale is a welcome addition to storytime and picture-book collections.--Jayne Damron, Farmington Community Library, MI

[Page 97]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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