Reviews for Cobra King of Kathmandu


BooklistOnline.com Reviews
In the third installment of Kerr's best-selling Children of the Lamp series, "djunior djinn" Tom and Philippa join their rebellious acquaintance, Dybbuk, in attempting to recover a treasure map's dangerous, hidden artifact. The trio trace clues to an ashram in Nepal, where Indiana Jones scenarios come fast and furiously as they explore underground caverns, wind up "nose to nose" with skeletons, and penetrate a snake-worshipping cult's inner sanctum. While keeping previous books' subplots simmering, Kerr widens readers' view of the ancient djinn race with further details about customs, historical conflicts, and humankind's faulty Ali Baba notions: "Any self-respecting djinn wouldn't be caught riding something as clichéd as a magic carpet." It's a little odd that there are no repercussions for Dybbuk's involvement in the opening art heist, and whimsical elements occasionally hinge on adult experience (the ashram runs a computer technical-support center that doles out nonsensical advice as "mental yoga"). Such quibbles aside, though, this adventure expands satisfyingly on a fantasy premise with proven legs. Copyright 2007 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
Djinn twins John and Philippa go to India in search of a cobra talisman giving the bearer power over their djinn friend, Mr. Rakshasas. The magical adventure moves quickly, keeping the action and the interest high. This installment introduces deeper concerns as well, including the loss of the twins' mother when she leaves to become the merciless Blue Djinn. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
Djinn twins John and Philippa go to India in search of a cobra talisman giving the bearer power over their djinn friend, Mr. Rakshasas. The magical adventure moves quickly, keeping the action and the interest high. This installment introduces deeper concerns as well, including the loss of the twins' mother when she leaves to become the merciless Blue Djinn. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2007 March

Gr 4-8-- This third installment in the series finds 12-year-old djinn twins Philippa and John embarking on a harrowing journey to Northern India and Nepal in search of the long-lost and powerful talisman, the Cobra King of Kathmandu. The twins believe that it holds the answers to certain mysterious deaths and hope to find it before it falls into the hands of the malevolent cult of the Nine Cobras, led by the egomaniacal Guru Masamjhasara, who seeks to profit from controlling and selling djinn power. However, the siblings soon find themselves imprisoned by the deadly cult and must rely upon their wits and a generous helping of good fortune to survive. This fast-paced, plot-driven fantasy adventure plunges readers into the curious world of djinn society and explores the many intriguing facets of its lore. The suspenseful plot twists, coupled with a liberal dosing of humor, make this a fun page-turner. Harry Potter fans will enjoy this foray into a different type of magical subculture.--Debbie Lewis O'Donnell, Alachua County Library District, Gainesville, FL

[Page 214]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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VOYA Reviews 2007 February
Djinn twins John and Philippa Gaunt return in the third installment of Kerr's Children of the Lamp series. When their sometime-friend Dybbuk e-mails them asking for help, the twins feel that they must go-despite the fact that mysterious individuals seem to be pursuing them. Traveling across several continents in an effort to find their Uncle Nimrod, the youngsters discover that he, too, is being pursued by the mysterious Cult of the Nine Cobras. Unaided, the three young djinns will have to marshal all their wits-and their wish-granting powers-to escape with their lives Kerr gets some things just right. His djinn world continues to develop in fascinating and creative ways. Some puns are amusing, such as "djinnternal mail," wherein one djinn swallows an object and sends it to another who coughs it up. Intermittent gross-out humor will amuse many. Also the complex welter of plot threads is satisfyingly gathered and tied together at the end. But the story suffers from excess: too many scenes whose only purpose is a punch line, too many perilous situations detracting from the climax, and too many secrets revealed but not resolved. This overkill blunts the impact of the work as a whole. Passionate fans of the series will probably overlook the lack of forward momentum and may excuse the predictability of some of the twists, but other readers are unlikely to find a story that vies with all the other great fantasy series available.-Catherine Gilmore-Clough 3Q 3P M J Copyright 2007 Voya Reviews.

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