Reviews for Case of the Gypsy Goodbye


Booklist Reviews 2010 May #1
*Starred Review* The series that features Enola Holmes, the (much) younger sister of Sherlock, continues to be flat-out among the best mysteries being written for young people today. Not only are the mysteries sharp attention holders but the conclusions are well thought out, with i's dotted and t's crossed in true Holmesian fashion. But now it appears readers will have to say adieu to Enola in what looks to be the final book. Here Enola, about to turn 15, takes on two mysteries. She must discover the whereabouts of a lovely duchess who disappeared down the Baker Street Subway station. But, more importantly, Enola receives a curious message from her mother, who deserted her a year ago. Now Enola learns her fate. Springer has always neatly inserted social messages into this series. They come to the forefront once again, set against evocative details of Victorian London. Solid adventure meshes with the personal longings of a girl estranged from her brothers and longing for her mum. Flap copy says this is the last book, but Sherlock ends it by telling his sister, "I cannot wait to see what on Earth you will do next." Us too. Copyright 2010 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2010 Fall
True to her previous adventures, Enola (Sherlock's sister) uncovers multiple social injustices lurking beneath the pomp of Victorian England. Enola, the quintessential spunky heroine, navigates the historical setting with the pluck of Nancy Drew but within the constraints of her upbringing. Springer takes time with her conclusion, letting this final series installment play out well and wrap up loose ends. Copyright 2010 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2010 #4
It's been one year and five books since Enola Holmes ran away from home after the mysterious disappearance of her mother. Since then she has contacted her mother through coded messages; managed to avoid her brothers Sherlock (yes, that Sherlock) and Mycroft Holmes, who want to pack her off to finishing school; and in a Remington Steele-like business (with Enola pretending to be the assistant to the fabricated Dr. Ragostin) established herself as a professional, logical "scientific perditorian," or finder of lost loved ones. In this concluding book in the series, Enola, true to her previous adventures, uncovers multiple social injustices lurking beneath the pomp of Victorian England. First, there's the matter of her mother, an independent woman trying to find her place in a world that dismisses the weaker sex. Second, there's the disappearance of Lady Blanchefleur, a lovely society matron who pays a high price for her envied figure. Third, there's Enola's personal problem: how to convince Sherlock and Mycroft that she doesn't need their protection. Enola, the quintessential spunky heroine, navigates the historical setting with the pluck of Nancy Drew but within the constraints of her upbringing. In contrast to other volumes, Springer takes time with her conclusion, letting this final series installment play out well and wrap up loose ends. Copyright 2010 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2010 June

Gr 5-9--In this fifth book in the series, Enola, younger sister of Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes, discovers that the royal Duque del Campo's wife, Duquessa Lady Blanchefleur, has gone missing. Through an array of pseudonyms and disguises, the 14-year-old sets out for the grimy underside of Baker Street's Underground station to search for her. Along the way, she encounters an old Gypsy woman wearing a chrysanthemum-blossom amulet displaying Enola's long-lost mother's initials. The woman bestows a fate upon Enola--that she is destined to be alone forever unless she chooses to defy the fate. As Enola struggles with the del Campo case and her mother's whereabouts, she collides with Sherlock. He hands over a mysterious packet that was left on his doorstep, revealed to be a cryptic "skytale" sent by their mother. Feelings about her abandonment begin to change, and all three siblings set out to Lady Blanchefleur. Although Springer builds upon the earlier titles and characters, a different side of Enola's character is presented. Through 19th-century London's dark atmospheric settings, Enola's flair shines through with perseverance and ingenuity. Her descriptive internal monologues demonstrate sensitivity as she discovers her mother's real reason for leaving. In this brilliantly written emotional tale, children will appreciate Enola's self-discovery on the importance of family and her determination to find her true fate.--Krista Welz, North Bergen Public Library, NJ

[Page 120]. Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

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