Reviews for Bean Thirteen


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
Two superstitious bugs try to divide up the thirteen beans they've picked for dinner. They keep ending up with one unlucky leftover--until a happy accident intervenes. Readers will be so entertained they may not realize they're learning math. Helping matters is the cartoony art in ultra-bright earth tones and other shades not found in nature. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

----------------------
Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
Two superstitious bugs try to divide up the thirteen beans they've picked for dinner. They keep ending up with one unlucky leftover--until a happy accident intervenes. Readers will be so entertained they may not realize they're learning math. Helping matters is the cartoony art in ultra-bright earth tones and other shades not found in nature. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

----------------------
Kirkus Reviews 2007 August #2
The "oddness" of prime numbers is driven home in this delightful tale of two bugs and their bean dinner. On a foraging expedition, Flora insists on picking just one more, even though Ralph is vehemently against having 13 beans, an unlucky number. The two perfect piles, and the one leftover bean, seem to prove him correct. But Flora is quick with a solution--call a friend and divide the beans into three even piles. Still one bean is leftover. More and more friends are invited, but that unlucky bean remains. What's the solution? Serve the beans family style. Flora invites the guests to take what they wish, and every bean is eaten. The only question left for Ralph is, "Who ate bean thirteen?" McElligott's imaginative pen-and-ink-and-digital illustrations feature brilliant hues and humorous bugs with a large vocabulary of body language. Pair this one with Elinor J. Pinczes's A Remainder of One (1995) to show just how unique prime numbers are. A must for every elementary-school library and classroom bookshelf. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus 2007 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.

----------------------
School Library Journal Reviews 2007 June

K-Gr 3-- In this humorous introduction to the concept of division, 2 bugs gather 13 beans and try to devise a way to share them evenly. Flora and Ralph think of several scenarios but in the end they still have "bean thirteen" left over. Even inviting their friends for dinner doesn't resolve the problem. Whether they plan on one guest or six, the beans cannot be arranged into equal portions. Then Ralph accidentally knocks the beans to the floor as their company arrives. He places all 13 into one bowl and each guest takes as many as he or she would like to eat. This resolves the problem, but leaves Flora and Ralph wondering who ended up consuming unlucky "bean thirteen." The story's pacing and the dialogue between the two bugs help children analyze the situation and follow the different possible grouping solutions. The large, limalike beans are a great visual aid and are easy to see when the book is read aloud. Done in pen and ink with digital effects, the cartoon illustrations feature bright hues and slightly off-kilter perspectives that will appeal to children. Youngsters will undoubtedly enjoy this funny tale; teachers will truly appreciate the connections it makes to their curriculum and the use of manipulatives in math.--Maura Bresnahan, High Plain Elementary School, Andover, MA

[Page 114]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

----------------------