Reviews for Firefighters' Thanksgiving


Booklist Reviews 2004 August #1
PreS-Gr. 2. This rhymed, picture-book tribute follows firefighters through a Thanksgiving Day as they struggle to shop and prepare a special meal in between calls to duty: "They wash the trucks, hang hose to dry / Roll out crust for pumpkin pie." Eventually, after raging fires leave one of the team hospitalized, the company of firefighters abandons meal preparation altogether only to receive a delicious, ready-to-eat feast from the grateful community. A few lines of text seem out of step with the story and may confuse young children: "Pack up gear and fill the tank. / Plan the next big rookie prank. / The turkey's frozen. Is it too late?" But the actions and sacrifice shine through the confusion, particularly in the large, slightly stylized acrylic paintings of firefighters amid the flames. Young children curious about rescue-worker stories will enjoy the suspense and drama of the men (and one woman) at work. ((Reviewed August 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Spring
The firefighters at Station 1 begin Thanksgiving with a trip to the grocery store. Fire alarms interrupt their cooking so many times that by the end of the day their turkey is still raw, but appreciative neighbors bring them a dinner. In a style reminiscent of the WPA artists, the acrylic images depict powerful scenes of danger and an array of firefighting equipment. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2004 July #1
Spare verse chronicles a day in the life of the firefighters of Station 1. But this isn't an ordinary day: it's Thanksgiving and firefighter Lou volunteers to prepare dinner for everyone. He buys the turkey, potatoes, yams, pumpkin, tomatoes, yeast, and ice cream, but fire-alarm calls repeatedly interrupt his preparations. When Lou is injured in a blaze, the firefighters' Thanksgiving dinner is all but forgotten until grateful neighbors save the day. Widener's strong, stylized acrylic illustrations highlight mundane as well as dramatic episodes in the firefighters' day. Bold, expressive spreads of firefighters in action, viewed from multiple angles, pay silent tribute to these everyday heroes. A satisfying holiday story with an unusual perspective. (Picture book. 4+) Copyright Kirkus 2004 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2004 September #4
Widener's (America's Champion Swimmer) artwork goes a long way to fill in the gaps in Boelts's (When It's the Last Day of School) skimpy rhyming text. In the busy firehouse, some men make beds while others shoot baskets. Fireman Lou volunteers, "I can cook today." Youngsters will enjoy the many interruptions in Lou's preparations of the holiday meal by fire alarms timed to complete the rhymes (e.g., "The cart is full, the shopping's through/ A call comes in-it's 9:02"). Lou gets injured on one such mission, but grateful community members bring a home-cooked meal to the station. Readers will revel in Widener's action-packed spreads of the heroes at work. Ages 4-up. (Aug.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2005 January
PreS-Gr 2-On Thanksgiving Day, the firefighters at Station 1 are busy preparing a holiday dinner. While two of them are grocery shopping in the morning, a call comes in over their cell phone and they rush out, leaving behind a full shopping cart. After they've put out the fire, they go back to the store, help mop up the melted ice cream, and return to the station. Then another call comes in. In fact, every time they put out a fire and return to the firehouse, they inevitably get another call. In one of the later fires, Lou, who had volunteered to cook, is injured. This time, when the others return, they find a sumptuous holiday feast with a heartfelt thank-you note attached, and they take some of this food to Lou in the hospital. Vibrant, somewhat surreal illustrations vividly depict the firefighters walking through doorways ablaze in orange flames. Despite a tendency toward a crowded, sometimes confusing look to the spreads and some forced rhyming structure, firefighter fans should enjoy this story.-James K. Irwin, Nichols Library, Naperville, IL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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