Reviews for Condoleezza Rice : A Memoir of My Extraordinary, Ordinary Family and Me


Booklist Reviews 2010 December #1
This slightly distilled version of former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice's concurrently published autobiography, Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family, hits all the high points of Rice's life. Raised in Birmingham, Alabama, Rice was the daughter of parents who convinced her that, as she puts it, "even if she couldn't have a hamburger at the Woolworth's lunch counter, she could be president of the United States." Filled with fascinating photos, this will not only introduce young people to a groundbreaking woman but will also give them a real sense of what life was like growing up in the segregated south in the 1950s and 1960s. High-school libraries might want the adult version of the book, but this one costs 10 dollars less. Copyright 2010 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2011 Spring
Condensing her adult memoir Extraordinary, Ordinary People, Rice is engaging and reasonably candid in this account of her life from childhood through January 2001, when she became George W. Bush's national security advisor. While Rice's most newsworthy years were yet to come, readers will still appreciate this honest (if not probing) self-appraisal, with a good balance of details from her childhood and career. Timeline. Glos. Copyright 2011 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2011 February

Gr 7 Up--The former Secretary of State recounts her life, beginning with her family history and childhood in Birmingham, AL, during the 1950s and '60s. From extremely supportive parents she learned that she could become anything she put her mind to, despite the rampant racism that existed in the South. A 16-page insert of black-and-white and color photos adds detail, and the glossary has more information on the many political leaders whom Rice refers to in the book. This valuable memoir about breaking glass ceilings may inspire readers to test their own potential.--Stephanie Malosh, Donoghue Elementary School, Chicago, IL

[Page 131]. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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VOYA Reviews 2011 February
In this autobiography, Condoleezza Rice speaks frankly of her life from childhood through her successful adult career. Rice is an only child and, as this book indicates, her parents played an instrumental role in shaping the person she is today. The reader begins Rice's life journey with her birth in 1950s racially segregated Birmingham, Alabama. Born the child of two educators, education was of paramount importance in her family. Not only did Rice prove herself to be gifted academically, at a young age she demonstrated the discipline to train in competitive figure skating and as an accomplished pianist. Beginning college at the University of Denver at the age of fifteen, Rice originally intended to become a professional pianist. That changed following a course instructed by Dr. Josef Korbel, a Soviet specialist. Rice majored in political science with a focus on Russian studies. She continued her studies, earning her Ph.D., and eventually became the youngest ever provost at Stanford University. Her experience led her to Washington, D. C., where under the Bush administration, she served on the National Security Council and was appointed Secretary of State This autobiography is a fascinating tale of how, under early segregated and depressed conditions, Rice rose to an outstanding political career. It highlights how her experiences and family created the political beliefs that she holds and professes currently. Rice is, without a doubt, an amazing woman. This book will serve as an inspiration for young female readers who are beginning their paths in life.--Ursula Adams 5Q 4P M J Copyright 2011 Voya Reviews.

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VOYA Reviews 2011 April
In this autobiography, Rice speaks frankly of her life from childhood through her successful adult career. Rice is an only child and, as this book indicates, her parents played an instrumental role in shaping the person she is today. The reader begins Rice's life journey with her birth in the 1950's racially segregated Birmingham, Alabama. Born the child of two educators, education was of paramount importance in her family. Not only did Rice prove herself to be gifted academically, at a young age she demonstrated the discipline to train in competitive figure skating and she was an accomplished pianist. Beginning college at the University of Denver at the age of fifteen, Rice originally intended to become a professional pianist. That changed following a course instructed by Dr. Josef Korbel, a Soviet specialist. Rice majored in political science with a focus on Russian studies. She continued her studies, earning her Ph.D., and eventually became the youngest ever provost at Stanford University. Her experience led her to Washington, D. C., where, under the Bush administration, she served on the National Security Council and was appointed Secretary of State This autobiography is a fascinating tale of how, under early segregated and depressed conditions, Rice rose to an outstanding political career. It highlights how her experiences and family created the political beliefs she holds and currently professes. Rice is, without a doubt, an amazing woman. This book will serve as an inspiration for young female readers who are beginning their journeys in life.--Ursula Adams 5Q 4P M J Copyright 2011 Voya Reviews.

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