Reviews for Lucy Rose, Here's the Thing About Me


Booklist Reviews 2004 November #1
Gr. 2-4. In the spirit of Junie B. Jones, Amber Brown, and mother of them all, Ramona, comes Lucy Rose. Eight years old, Lucy has just moved to Washington, D.C., with her mother after her parents' separation. Kelly covers familiar ground. Lucy misses her father, she takes the classroom gerbil home for vacation and loses him, and Alan Melon, her nemesis (he has given her a valentine that says "You are a fart"), eventually becomes a friend. Her knowing yet funny voice will be familiar to any kid who has read books about Ramona or Junie or Amber. Yet there's something especially endearing about Lucy Rose, and her interactions with her parents, grandparents, teacher, and friends all seem believable and comfortable. Written as a month-by-month diary, this will give a push to readers ready to move beyond chapter books. Planned illustrations were not available in galley. ((Reviewed November 1, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Fall
After her parents separate, eight-year-old Lucy Rose and her mom move to Washington, D.C. Through her diary, Lucy Rose keeps track of daily challenges--class pets, troublesome boys, friendships--in these readable books that exude third-grade appeal. Though simple resolutions at times make the books tedious, Lucy Rose's snappy spirit is appealing. Rex's black-and-white drawings enhance the text. [Review covers these titles: [cf2]Lucy Rose: Big on Plans[cf1] and [cf2]Lucy Rose: Here's the Thing about Me[cf1].] Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2004 September #1
Bouncier than a bowl of Jell-O, innately bubbly Lucy Rose, eight, undergoes a tremendous struggle; her parents have separated and the resulting upheaval leaves her no comfort zone. Her inherently positive attitude and family's nurturing care, revealed in Kelly's deft use of first-person narrative, shows how a sparkling personality copes with serious as well as marginal problems such as obnoxious boys in her new school. Lucy Rose does not always know what her observations of family and friends mean, but between the lines, readers can see what she does not: how her parents are coping with their new arrangement while trying to keep life as normal as possible for their daughter or just how truthful the responses from her advice-columnist grandmother are. Lucy Rose's mental growth is perceptible; she develops into her new situation, learns to set aside her longing for the past, and builds a new life, all in a text that delivers these mature and complex concepts simply enough for her young audience, an amazing feat for any author, especially in a debut. Overall, the wonder is that third-grade vocabulary is sufficient to communicate the depth of Lucy Rose's hard-won growth. (Fiction. 8-11) Copyright Kirkus 2004 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2004 September #3
At the start of Kelly's entirely engaging first novel, third grader Lucy Rose introduces herself with appealing self-assuredness: "Here is the thing about me: According to my dad, I am one smart cookie. And according to my grandfather, I have the kind of life that is called eventful, which means not boring." Though readers will easily identify with the events in Lucy Rose's life, this candid heroine's energetic delivery of the boundless "things" she shares about herself makes them sound unique-and highly entertaining. Since her parents' recent separation, Lucy Rose has moved from Michigan to Washington, D.C., with her mother, whose own parents live nearby. Appropriately named Madam and Pop (given the girl's penchant for palindromes), Lucy Rose's wise and witty grandparents play a significant role in her life. The red-haired, freckled youngster narrates in breathless run-on sentences that call to mind Eloise's endearing chatter ("Here are some things about Mr. Welsh [my teacher]: He has a nice look of not too much hair and little round eyeglasses and he is skinnier than my dad and my grandfather, probably because he is one for good eating habits"). The incidents Lucy Rose recounts range from comical to genuinely affecting, as she begins to settle into her new surroundings. Her father tells her she has a "one-of-a-kind mind." Readers will resoundingly agree: she has a truly original perspective-and voice-and they will hope Lucy Rose returns to reveal more "things" about herself. Ages 8-12. (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2004 September
Gr 2-4-Lucy Rose is trying to adjust to all the changes in her life. Her parents have separated and she and her mother have moved to Washington, DC, to be closer to Lucy's maternal grandparents. The third grader misses her dad and her old friends, and she is struggling to fit in at her new school. She must also deal with Adam Melon, a boy in her class who teases her. Lucy wants a pet to replace the dog she left with her father so she is on a campaign to get her teacher to let her care for the class guinea pig during spring break. Inevitably, the animal gets lost, leading to disaster, and help comes from an unlikely source. Lucy's plight, which is told in diary format, is one shared by many children who are adjusting to life in broken families. The child meets her challenges with humor and honesty. Her grandparents and mother serve as key supporting players. This first-time author has captured the trials, tribulations, and joys of this eight-year-old. Lucy Rose is not as finely honed as Amber Brown or Judy Moody but she is funny, and she has a unique voice.-Linda Zeilstra Sawyer, Skokie Public Library, IL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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