Reviews for Snow Day


Booklist Monthly Selections - #2 February 2000
Ages 3^-6. Under an orange wash of sunny sky, a child bounds across a solid white plain of snow in the first spread of this lovely, wordless picture book. In sublimely minimal, delicate watercolors, newcomer Peddle paints the child as he builds a snowman throughout the day, each page showing the sun's progression until dusk comes, and the snowman is left alone in the dark. The following image is worth the price of the book: the horizon disappears, and we are suddenly looking at the earth from space, the snowman sitting on top of it, stick arms outstretched to a galaxy of floating stars. Morning comes, a pink sun rises, and the snowman disappears in a radiant ball of golden light. Deceptively simple images leave this beautiful book wide open for interpretation. Young ones may find cosmic significance in the snowman, or they may think the story is simply about melting. Either way, this is one book adults and children will want to share, discuss, and return to again and again. ((Reviewed February 15, 2000)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2000 Fall
Any wordless picture book about a snowman must endure comparison to Raymond Briggs's modern classic, and this pretentious, confusing volume doesn't come close to measuring up. After a boy creates him, the snowman in the spare watercolor artwork sits on successive, mostly white pages, looking more like a doodle than a being significant enough to ascend to the sun, which is what he apparently does in the end. Copyright 2000 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 1999 December #2
Peddle debuts with a small, wordless epiphany that flows like an animated short. A low winter sun first lights a child building a snowman, then, after a gloriously starry night, returns to transform it to melt it. Leaving most of each page untouched, Peddle assembles a minimum of accurately brushed pictorial elements for each scene: the builder; the snow figure; their lengthening shadows; the rising sun's coruscating circle in the penultimate picture; a scatter of sticks, coal, and a carrot in the final one. Most children will still prefer The Snowy Day, but others may find layers of meaning beneath the story's deceptive simplicity. (Picture book. 4-9) Copyright 2000 Kirkus Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1999 November #5
Youngsters will be caught up in this wordless picture book right from the eye-catching snow-white front cover, overlaid with the spot-varnished images of a carrot nose and two coal eyes. Peddle's impressive debut pairs delicate, spare watercolors with a clever design to chronicle the beginning and end of a snowman in a single day. The artist opens with a white foreground and a tiny figure of a child below the yellow horizon. On subsequent pages, shadows lengthen as the child builds a snowman, the sun sets and the snowman stands alone against a deep blue sky filled with holiday-card snowflakes. At the turn of the page, the snowman perches atop the planet in a field of stars. The spaceship view disappears when dawn arrives, and finally, all that remains is a smudge of stick arms, pieces of coal and a carrot on a page as pristine as the snow itself. Peddle conveys a strong sense of narrative in the visual echoes he sets up. For instance, as the boy assembles the two bottom spheres of his snow creation, the head-sized noon sun appears to complete the picture. This playful configuration sets the stage for the later image of a one-dimensional snowman engulfed in the sun's halo. His witty approach allows children to enjoy the natural progression of the snowman's fate. Ages 3-up. (Jan.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2000 March
PreS-In a minimal style, using large areas of snowy white and tiny figures, the artist details the short but lovely life of a snowman. A happy snowsuited child rolls three balls for his creation under a glowing orange early morning sky, adding sticks for arms, pieces of coal for buttons and eyes, and a carrot nose. The afternoon sun shines on the finished work, casting blue shadows, and then sinks with a flaming aura in violet dusk. For a while the snowman reigns supreme atop the world in a star- and snow-filled night, but when a warm sun reappears in a pinkish dawn glow, he melts into a gold-rimmed circle. The delicate, simple watercolors tell the wordless story with charm and beauty.-Patricia Pearl Dole, formerly at First Presbyterian School, Martinsville, VA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

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