Reviews for Rapunzel : A Nursery Rap


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 January 1998
Ages 4^-7. Like Vozar and Lewin's M. C. Turtle and the Hip Hop Hare (1996), this happenin' rap gives an old story an urban setting, a rhythmic beat, and a contemporary silliness that kids will love. Everything takes place in the hood, where spoiled Rapunzel whines for the newest designer wear, the prince gives her split ends when he climbs her hair, and the witch zaps him into the wilderness of downtown. Lewin's wild, scribbled cartoons, with thick lines and neon colors, pick up the nonsense in word and action. Great to read aloud, this would be fun to pair with Zelinsky's sumptuous traditional Rapunzel (1997) to increase kids' pleasure in both the parody and the original fairy tale. ((Reviewed January 1 & 15, 1998)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 1998
This hip-hop fairy tale moves Rapunzel's tower from the woods to Copyright 1998 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1997 December #2
Despite a thick spray of puns and allusions, this fairy-tale parody delivered in rap the hair apparent to Vozar and Lewin's Yo, Hungry Wolf! disappoints with its inconsistent text. Dogs have the day: Lewin's fittingly hyperbolic cartoons depict the heroine as an unspecified white pooch with flowing golden tresses, while Prince Fine, her suitor, sports a lime-green mohawk and tattoos along with his gray-and-white coat. Rapunzel, aka Rap, complains all day, "for a TV and radio./ She whined to have pizza made to go"; she is obsessed with styling her hair the worst sort of princess. Prince Fine becomes the narrator midway through with an abrupt shift from third- to first-person: "The witch climbed down the stunning girl's locks/ As I was jogging right down her block./ They call me Fine Prince. Everyone loves me./ There's no one who rises above me." But the livelier scenarios show flashes of wit: the prince, after waiting all day for his beloved to finish blow-drying her locks, discovers that she has teased her mane "in a new def style" that reaches for the sky, leaving him no way to reach her. But in the end, like the hair of the newly shorn heroine, the rap comes up short. Ages 4-7. (Mar.) Copyright 1998 Publishers Weekly Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 1998 May
Another traditional tale rendered in raplike rhyme and rhythm. This format, very successful in Yo, Hungry Wolf (Doubleday, 1993), is less so in RAPunzel. Funny illustrations depict the witch as a gray dog with purplish hair and Rapunzel as a poodle with long, curly golden tresses. Rap becomes a demanding teen, and Witch tires of providing for her: "Witch spent all her time pleasing Rap./All Rap wanted, the witch would just zap!/She zapped braces for Rap's crooked molars./When Rap wanted curls, Zap! appeared rollers./But Rapunzel soon wanted `More! More!'/Whining and whining from noon to four." Fine Prince, a local dog (with a green mohawk) wants to visit, but Rap is busy filing her nails and washing her hair. Finally, Rap becomes a hairdresser, marries Fine Prince, has two kids, and, in a trendsetting move, cuts off all her hair. Bright, cartoon illustrations add action and appeal, and are far superior to the overly long text. The uninspired rhyming seems forced, and the book as a whole falls flat. Lisa Falk, Los Angeles Public Library. Copyright 1998 School Library Journal Reviews

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