Reviews for Doctor Squash The Doll Doctor


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2011 Spring
Dr. Squash attends to the dolls' ailments. When he falls sick, the dolls use his techniques to heal him. The details of imaginative play are right on target for the audience. Brown's story (the text is slightly revised, though it's still a little dated) is reissued with fresh illustrations that maintain a friendly, old-fashioned appearance. Copyright 2011 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2010 September #2
A Little Golden Book first published in 1952 with illustrations by J.P. Miller sees new life with new art, proving yet again that Brown is synonymous with timelessness. When dolls are sick or in pain, there's really only one doctor to call: the good Doctor Squash, who attends to their every need. From broken legs and poison ivy to coughs and the mumps, the doctor always has the right cure on hand. And when the doc falls ill, the dolls take care of him in return. Some of the original text has been updated to suit the times (for example, the Wild Indian Doll becomes simply the Indian Doll). Gone too are such anachronistic images as the mammy doll. Appropriate though these changes may be, it is a pity that there is no mention of them in this new edition. Nevertheless, playing doctor with dolls never falls out of style, and Hitch's retro style and modern toy updates work overtime to ensure that this book becomes a classic all over again. Entertaining and charming. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus 2010 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2010 December

K-Gr 3--This newly illustrated reissue of a 1952 Golden Book recounts the illnesses of various dolls--squeaky soldier, teddy bear with a bloody nose, fireman with a broken leg, Indian with poison ivy, etc--and Doctor Squash, who comes running to dispense medicine and advice as needed. When the good doctor falls ill, the toys get the chance to return the favor and take care of him. Hitch's cartoon illustrations complement the text well with bright colors and great facial expressions. They are updated from the original (no Mammy doll) but still have an old-fashioned look. References to the snowman doll's illness and "wild Indian" have been removed. Perplexingly, the story does continue to refer to cough drops as "good as candy and just as pretty" and to mention writing prescriptions for measles, mumps, chicken pox, and whooping cough. Updated, but still a bit out-of-date.--Catherine Callegari, Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH

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