Reviews for Meet The Gecko


Booklist Reviews 2005 February #1
Gr. 3-5. Nolan Byrd is delighted to learn that the cast of his favorite television show The Gecko and Sticky is coming to his town to film an episode. He's even more pleased when his journalist father announces that he's been assigned to interview Chase Morton, the young star of the show, and invites Nolan along. Chase and Nolan hit it off immediately, and Chase confesses his fear of a whacked-out reporter called the Mole, who has been stalking him. Nolan takes a picture of the Mole committing an act of vandalism and spreads the information through his Internet alter ego, Shredderman. At the same time, Nolan reaches out to his nemesis, Bubba Bixby. This is the third in the Shredderman series, all of which feature short chapters and a lighthearted, fast-moving story, with Nolan serving as a true hero, despite his geeky ways. ((Reviewed February 1, 2005)) Copyright 2005 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Fall
The third and fourth books about an elementary school superhero who uses the Internet stretch credibility more than the first two. When Nolan, as "Shredderman," unmasks an unscrupulous tabloid reporter and a possible spy ring, local news agencies and even the FBI have trouble discovering his secret identity. Though these volumes will attract fans, Shredderman should have stuck to school problems. [Review covers these Shredderman titles: [cf2]Enemy Spy[cf1] and [cf2]Meet the Gecko[cf1].] Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2004 December #2
Fifth-grade math prodigy Nolan Byrd and his secret identity--Internet Superhero Shredderman--returns for a third adventure. Nolan's reporter father lands the sweet assignment of interviewing pre-teen TV sensation Chase Morton a.k.a. The Gecko. "The Gecko and Sticky" is Nolan's favorite show, and he gets to tag along because it's his birthday. The boys hit it off, and Nolan decides to have Shredderman help Chase get rid of a particularly nasty paparazzi called "The Mole." Digital photos, sneaky camera work and Shredderman's Web site put an end to the Mole's slimy career. Nolan is also able to extend the hand of friendship to his former adversary, Bubba Bixby who is also a fan by taking "Alvin" with him to meet their idol. Reluctant readers, be they old fans or new, will enjoy the humor, swift pacing, and Biggs's heavy-line cartoon illustrations. Cyber-hero fun for everyone, and, of course, future installments are on the way. (Fiction. 7-11) Copyright Kirkus 2004 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2005 January #1
Long-awaited sequels and favorite characters return in a slew of novels this winter. Continuing the action-packed series begun with Shredderman: Secret Identity, which PW hailed as "a one-man Revenge of the Nerds for the elementary crowd," Wendelin Van Draanen returns with Shredderman: Meet the Gecko, illus. by Brian Biggs. Here Nolan (aka Shredderman) meets his hero-or should one say, superhero-Chase Morton, who plays The Gecko on TV. But Chase is being chased, and Nolan is determined to expose the stalker on Shredderman.com. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2005 January
Gr 3-6-The endearing cyber-superhero, Shredderman, otherwise known as Nolan Byrd, exposes yet another annoying nuisance through the use of his anonymous Web site. The 11-year-old's favorite television superhero, The Gecko, comes to his hometown of Cedar Valley to shoot an episode, and Nolan's father, a newspaper reporter, is assigned to cover the story. The boy not only gets to meet Chase Morton, but also plays video games with him, and the two form a friendship. School bully Bubba Bixby also wants to meet the popular on-screen personality, causing even more tension between the two boys. As Nolan witnesses Bubba's resentment toward him, he learns that sometimes being a superhero is about "being bigger than yourself," and invites Bubba to meet Chase. Nolan is also successful in exposing an unethical photographer, causing quite a stir in the journalism community. The protagonist's strength in rising above his fear of Bubba and showing compassion for him is gently and poignantly portrayed. Reluctant readers will find this book accessible, and the use of modern technology to fight the "bad guys" is an appealing inclusion.-Jennifer Cogan, Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, MD Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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