Reviews for Tell Me, Tree : All About Trees for Kids


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 April 2002
Ages 4-8. In this large-format guide, Gibbons discusses the parts of a tree and their functions, the growth of trees, and the different types of trees. She introduces topics such as photosynthesis and the meaning of terms such as phloem and cambium. In the almost wordless section on identification, the shapes of 15 different trees are shown alongside close-ups of their leaves and bark. The book closes with a discussion of how trees are useful to people, animals, and the environment, and directions for making a tree identification book. The bright watercolor illustrations show cheerful children and adults observing, planting, using, and enjoying many kinds of trees. In this simple, informative book, Gibbons provides a basic guide that is sure to please parents and teachers as well as children. ((Reviewed April 1, 2002)) Copyright 2002 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2002 Fall
Gibbons takes readers through a description of the growth of trees, stopping along the way to mention all the basics: the different shapes and sizes of trees, leaves, and bark; conditions needed for growth; parts of a plant and their functions; and the importance of tree conservation. Gibbons's signature illustrations show children studying trees; close-ups depict plant seeds, fruit, and the like (all labeled). Copyright 2002 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2002 #4
Gibbons takes readers through a description of the growth of trees from seed to tree, stopping along the way to mention all the classroom basics: the different shapes and sizes of trees, leaves, and bark; conditions needed for plant growth; parts of a plant and their functions in growth; and the importance of tree conservation. The explanations stay at a rather simple level, though they incongruously incorporate fairly sophisticated vocabulary. Gibbons's signature page-filling illustrations show children studying trees; close-ups depict plant seeds, fruit, and the like (all labeled). While the illustrations of plant parts are intricate enough to show important detail, the organization of the book does not follow the conventions of a field guide, particularly in the tree descriptions section, making it difficult to use the book for basic identification purposes. Directions for the old standby activities of leaf pressing and bark rubbing can be found at the end of the book, along with additional facts about trees. Copyright 2002 Horn Book Magazine Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 2002 March #1
A very fine introduction to trees for beginning and challenged readers. Gibbons, in her usual careful manner, discusses tree seeds and tree parts, including stems, bark, roots, and leaves. Each two- or three-page topic is begun "Tell Me, Tree . . ." setting up the idea that the budding scientist can learn from examining the tree itself. She provides labeled diagrams of the inside and outside of trees and explains specialized terms such as cambium, phloem, sapwood, heartwood, chlorophyll, and photosynthesis. Her trademark pen-and-watercolor drawings appear on every page, complementing and extending the text. A dozen trees are included in the "Identifying Trees" section showing leaves, bark, and the full tree outline-a terrific tool for adults, too. She concludes with directions for collecting and pressing leaves and making bark rubbings and a page of interesting facts. This is such a natural subject for Gibbons, it's a wonder she hasn't done it before. Sure to please. (Nonfiction. 5-9) Copyright Kirkus 2002 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved

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School Library Journal Reviews 2002 March
K-Gr 3-This inviting, oversized book lives up to its subtitle. The large watercolor pictures, peopled by children of various ethnic backgrounds, make it a perfect book for classroom sharing. Gibbons discusses the parts of the tree and their functions, types of fruits and seeds, kinds of bark, and uses for trees. She includes a discussion of photosynthesis and gives directions for students to make their own tree identification books. Relevant terms are highlighted in the text and identified in the illustrations. It's a good book to team with Diane Burns's Trees, Leaves, and Bark (NorthWord, 1995; o.p.) and Arthur Dorros's A Tree Is Growing (Scholastic, 1997).-Jean Lowery, Bishop Woods Elementary School, New Haven, CT Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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