Reviews for Mr. Wolf and the Three Bears


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2002 Fall
Mr. Wolf intends to throw Baby Bear a dignified birthday party, but Goldilocks storms in uninvited and wreaks havoc--until Grandma Wolf sees a solution to both her own hankering for pie and to everyoneÆs desire to be rid of the ill-mannered girl. The humorous illustrations are well suited to this spry, delectably dark comedy. Recipes for party treats are included. Copyright 2002 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 2002 March #1
It is Baby Bear's birthday, and Mr. Wolf (Mr. Wolf and the Pancakes, 2000) and Grandma are preparing a fine birthday party. But they know that the Three Bears are proud eaters, so they have a lot of work to do. In this new spin on classic characters, the Wolves throw together Huff Puff Cakes and stacks of sandwiches and a great big birthday cake, and then toil like demons to spiff up the house. And then who should barge through the door along with the guests of honor, but Goldilocks, the most horrific creature the woods has to offer. " ‘What have you brought her for?' whispered Mr. Wolf." "There was nothing we could do," answers Daddy Bear, noting that Goldilocks said she was invited, the little fibber. She proceeds to ruin the party, incongruously and pleasingly caught in Fearnley's delicate and oh-so-amusing watercolors: A bad girl making mischief, snatching at all the food, ruining the games. Then Grandma Wolf suggests a game of hide-and-seek, asking that nobody go into the kitchen, which is of course directly where Goldilocks heads-and disappears. Not long thereafter, Grandma emerges with a great-looking pie: "You never know what you'll find in the kitchen," she says. Predictable as it turns the old standard on its head, nonetheless Goldilocks is so loathsome, and likely so recognizable, that when she gets her just deserts-offstage left, out of reader's sight-it feels like all is right in the world. Recipes include Baby Bear's Birthday Cake, Mommy Bear's Sandwiches, as well as Grandma's Golden Pie (filling of choice). If Mr. Wolf isn't careful, he's going to run out of fairytale characters to eat. (Picture book. 3-7) Copyright Kirkus 2002 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2002 March #4
Mr. Wolf, who enjoyed flapjacks with a side order of Chicken Little in Mr. Wolf's Pancakes, is an easygoing chef with a take-no-prisoners approach to etiquette. In another archly hilarious gathering of nursery characters, he now prepares a birthday feast for Baby Bear, with help from Grandma. When the Three Bears arrive, "someone barged in front of them! It was Goldilocks!" A smirking girl stands in the doorway with eyes narrowed and arms akimbo. "She said she was invited, too," Daddy Bear protests, fiddling unhappily with his tie. The hosts frown uncomfortably while the blonde bully stuffs her face with Huff Puff Cakes and Cheesy Snipsnaps (recipes are provided, along with a plug for a Mr. Wolf Web site). To distract Baby Bear, who weeps in despair, Grandma calls for a game of hide-and-seek, "but no hiding in the kitchen, please." Afterward, Goldilocks fails to reappear. "Never mind," says Grandma, carrying in a huge, steaming hot pie, crimped in a familiar curly design. "She's gone now, and I've made us a special treat to celebrate." With her consistently wry humor, Fearnley does not reveal the mystery filling of the "golden" dessert in either text or her innocent-looking illustrations. Readers will relish the satisfying, wicked twist; party-crashers, beware. Ages 3-7. (Apr.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2002 June
PreS-Gr 2-The overtly benevolent protagonist from Mr. Wolf's Pancakes (Little Tiger, 2000) entertains more familiar characters here. It so happens that he is throwing a birthday party for Baby Bear. With Grandma Wolf joining him, they whip up a delectable feast that includes Cheesy Snipsnaps from a recipe that the technologically savvy elder finds at www.hungry-wolf.com. The Three Bears arrive at the door only to be pushed aside as Goldilocks barges in, claiming to have an invitation. Grandma extracts a promise from the girl to behave, but, true to form, Goldilocks's greediness and insensitivity have Baby Bear in tears and the party in shambles. Mr. Wolf's subtle cunning is clearly genetic as evidenced by Grandma's clever suggestion of a game of hide-and-seek. Goldilocks tears off to hide in the kitchen, exclaiming on her way, "I always win." Grandma's cryptic reply, "We'll see about that," becomes clearer after the child has disappeared and a big beautiful pie with a golden crust emerges from the kitchen. This appears to be a case of an unsavory character's receiving her just "desserts." As in Pancakes, Fearnley tells the story with enough of a wink and a nod so as not to alarm children. The cozy watercolor and pen-and-ink illustrations also serve to diffuse the more macabre elements of the tale. Delightful endpapers with culinary tips are an added bonus.-Rosalyn Pierini, San Luis Obispo City-County Library, CA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

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