Reviews for Whose House?


Booklist Reviews 2004 May #1
PreS. A young boy considers various animal abodes: "A lodge of twigs is a beaver's digs," but although it's fine for beavers, "It's not for me!" Nor is the hollow log that's good for a frog or the pine hotel where the brown bats dwell. The humor here comes when the boy finds himself actually in the animals' homes--up in the tree with the chickadee, crawling through a beehive with honey splattered on his head. The text is catchy, and the idea of visiting an animal's house is tinged with fantasy, but sometimes Chorao's watercolor, ink, and colored pencil artwork has an ordinary feel, as when the boy lies down in a clearing with a doe and her fawn; other pictures feature animals dressed in clothing, sitting in chairs. In the end, of course, the boy finds a house that works well for him--his own. Light humor and a comforting message give this lots of child appeal. ((Reviewed May 1, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2004 Fall
A little boy ponders all the animal homes that are well suited to their owners but don't work for humans. Chorao's childlike illustrations, of the boy tangled in the sticks of a beaver home and huddled on the branches of a sycamore tree, are quite humorous. The text nicely incorporates facts about nature, but with its awkward rhymes it is not as strong as the art. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2004 May #5
A sleepy boy tries out different animal habitats in Whose House? by Barbara Seuling, illus. by Kay Chorao. Rhymed stanzas describe the animals' activities: "A thousand bees with a queen to please/ work in a maze/ of hive passageways./ It's fine for bees/ but not for me!," with the last line becoming a refrain of sorts. Chorao's illustrations run to such humorous images as a newspaper-reading frog frowning at the boy's intrusion upon his log and an predatory owl wearing a polka-dotted bib as he chases his prey. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2004 August
PreS-Gr 2-A little boy imagines what life would be like if he lived in various animal "houses." He tries out a beaver lodge, a frog's log, and even a beehive. He also samples a tree limb, mimicking the lives of a chickadee, a bat, an owl, and a chipmunk. Finally, he decides that the house that is "just right" for him has a red roof, a fluffy cat, a warm bed, and a mom and dad. This simple picture book has just three lines of text leading up to, "It's fine for [insert name of animal]- but not for me!" It could stimulate questions and discussion about the various creatures. Chorao's soft watercolor illustrations are pleasant, and the last one, of the boy sleeping in his bed, leaves readers with a cozy, safe feeling. However, there is one major inconsistency: the text says that "curling up on the ground" is not for the child, yet he is shown sound asleep there. There are several good picture books about animal houses, including Mary Ann Hoberman's A House Is a House for Me (Viking, 1978), Margaret Wise Brown's The Wonderful House (Golden, 1998), and Linda Ashman's Castles, Caves, and Honeycombs (Harcourt, 2001), which is dramatically illustrated by Lauren Stringer. Whose House? is an additional purchase.-Elaine Lesh Morgan, Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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