Reviews for Mr. Putter & Tabby Dance the Dance


Booklist Reviews 2012 October #1
When Mr. Putter's neighbor, Mrs. Teaberry, proposes that they try ballroom dancing, he reluctantly agrees. Accompanied by Tabby the cat and Zeke the dog, they attend a dance at the Crystal Ballroom. Tabby bats the sparkly lights, and Zeke performs the tango with abandon, while Mr. Putter and Mrs. Teaberry cha-cha-cha. Written with simplicity and understated humor, the story springs to life visually through the strong, energetic pencil drawings brightened with watercolor and gouache. The young audience will enjoy seeing these familiar characters express themselves on and off the dance floor. An upbeat addition to the Mr. Putter and Tabby easy reader series. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2013 Spring
Mrs. Teaberry and Zeke are anxious to try ballroom dancing; Mr. Putter isn't so sure, but Mrs. Teaberry knows how to win him. Three short chapters have the foursome tearing up the dance floor. The text of simple and compound words flows beautifully despite the uncomplicated sentence structure; expressive pencil, watercolor, and gouache illustrations bring out the characters' delightful personalities.

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2012 #5
In the twenty-first adventure with Mr. Putter and Tabby, Mrs. Teaberry and Zeke are anxious to try something new -- ballroom dancing. Mr. Putter isn't so sure. He worries about his dignity and pleads old age, two left feet, and to have not danced since 1947. But Mrs. Teaberry knows how to win him: "You are a wonder at everything." Three short chapters have this foursome tearing up the dance floor with Tabby batting at sparkles ("even the ballroom water was sparkly") and Zeke stealing the show. Using a variety of perspectives and expressive lines, the pencil, watercolor, and gouache illustrations bring out each character's delightful personality. Large font, plenty of white space, and a clean design encourage independent reading and make the humor pop. The text of simple and compound words flows beautifully in spite of the uncomplicated sentence structure and deliberate vocabulary. It introduces more challenging words slowly and naturally, which will help readers feel like wonders right along with Mr. Putter. julie roach

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