Reviews for Wizard's Holiday


Booklist Reviews 2004 January
Gr. 5-7. Fans of Duane's popular Young Wizards series get two new episodes in one: Kit and Nita travel to an idyllic planet for a vacation, while back on Earth, Nita's father and little sister, Dairine, host a trio of wizardly alien exchange students. As it turns out, both planets are headed for large-scale catastrophes that will call on every ounce of power, courage, wit, and knowledge that the wizards-in-training can summon. Duane never draws the two plotlines together (one shows signs of continuing on into a future volume), but she switches smoothly between them, and, as usual, her cast members demonstrate an inventive array of body shapes, personalities, and magical abilities. The author takes up too much of her telling with explanations designed to help the stories stand on their own, or to add a few new wrinkles to her unique, complex magical cosmology. But even though events are slow to develop, the lively cast will carry patient readers through situations that are, in turn, hilarious and scary. ((Reviewed January 1 & 15, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2004 Spring
On a cultural exchange trip to the planet Alaalu, wizards Kit and Nita confront the Lone Power to make it allow a species' evolution; at home, sister Dairine fixes a fault in the sun with help from other exchange wizards. In addition to the convoluted cosmology and superabundance of irrelevant detail, the technical-manual ""magic"" is dry reading, and loose ends are left hanging in the abrupt ending. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2003 November #4
In the seventh book in the Young Wizards series, Wizard's Holiday by Diane Duane, Nita and her friend Kit go on vacation to a planet halfway across the galaxy, as part of a wizard cultural exchange program. Meanwhile, three very strange alien wizards visit Nita's father and her sister Dairine on Earth. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2003 December
Gr 6-8-What would a cultural exchange program be like on a galactic scale? Dairine Callahan wants to find out, and, without obtaining permission, makes plans to go, along with her older sister Nita, on a trip to another planet while alien wizards visit their home on Earth. When Dairine is found out and grounded, her surprisingly amenable father still allows her to host the guests as planned. Meanwhile, Nita; her best friend, Kit Rodriguez; and Kit's dog, Ponch, spend two weeks on Alaalu, a planet that seems halcyonic. Back at home, Dairine is thrilled to welcome Filif, a sentient tree, and Sker'ret, a large purple caterpillarlike creature, but Roshaun, an arrogant humanoid, threatens to make the entire experience miserable. However, on both Alaalu and Earth, the Lone Power continues to work in unpredictable ways. The wizards discover that they may not be on holiday after all, and that the civilizations of both planets are in danger of annihilation. While the narrative moves at a more leisurely pace than in preceding novels, the presentation of imaginative scenarios and challenges that are anything but clear-cut provide enough interest for fans of the series. New readers will have incentive to seek out the earlier books.-Farida S. Dowler, formerly at Bellevue Regional Library, WA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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VOYA Reviews 2004 April
Nita is amused but not surprised when her little sister, Dairine, gets in trouble. Dairine is to be sanctioned for trying to register herself and Nita for a wizardly exchange program. When their father agrees that Nita and her wizarding partner, Kit, may be the subjects of the exchange, Nita is thrilled. Her preparations start the dual story line of the seventh book in the Young Wizards series. Nita and Kit are sent to Alaalu, a utopian world where the overcoming of the Lone Power means that all beings live serenely without aging, pain, or death. But it is a life that both Nita and Kit find surprisingly wrong. Back on Earth, Dairine and her father prepare for the three visitors at their side of the exchange: Sker'ret, a giant centipede; Flif, a walking tree; and Roshaun, an alien prince. The visitors each have their own perspectives of Earth, and their requirements bring humor to the book. Both story lines develop serious turns, and it is up to the planets' visitors to work quickly with the natives to save both planets from a desperate fate Unlike in other books in this series, Duane takes the time here to develop most minor characters, including family members, giving a reader unfamiliar with the series a chance to catch up and find out the backstory. The story is also lighter than the preceding books, which should appeal to a much wider audience, both in age and in gender. Readers interested in books about wizards will appreciate one that offers not only a serious consideration of the use of magic but also its users.-Betsy Fraser 4Q 4P M J S Copyright 2004 Voya Reviews.

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