Reviews for Slimed! : An Oral History of Nickelodeon's Golden Age


Book News Reviews
Klickstein presents this collection of interviews with Nickelodeon cast and other network participants. The first chapter interviews cast who were child actors and grew up during their tenure on Nickelodeon. Next the recipes for the iconic green slime are revealed and the lighthearted mood implied therein is elaborated from a backstage perspective. The development of the visual and musical aesthetics is followed by a sober discussion of the diversity or lack thereof on the network. The book wraps up with conversations about challenges and the changes on the network over time. A character listing in the back matches the interviewees to their roles in acting or production. Distributed in the US by Viking Penguin. Annotation ©2014 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)

----------------------
Publishers Weekly Reviews 2013 October #1

Klickstein (Rag Doll: A Horrotica Novel) compiles an oral history of the famous kid-oriented TV channel that started in the late 1970s as Pinwheel Network and became Nickelodeon. The oral history approach allows for unmediated stories and encompasses a diverse set of opinions without prioritizing one voice more than others. Actors open up about going through puberty while on TV and the musician Mark Mulcahy, from the late-80s band Miracle Legion, talks about developing the theme song for the show The Adventures of Pete & Pete. The book contains a recipes for Nick's famed green slime, discussions of the concept behind the logo and mission--"‘have fun' and… ‘we like orange'"--and speculation about the effects of the network's success. In the words of Alan Goodman, a writer Hey Dude and Clarissa Explains It All, "Grown-ups took control of the slime and made it pretty." The book's strength--it's grounding in oral history--is also its biggest weakness. Klickstein provides little to no context, besides a who's who list at the back of the book, so it's very easy to get lost in interviews. There's a wealth of information, but it can be hard to parse. Agent: Janet Rosen, Sheree Bykofsky Associates, Inc. (Sept.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

----------------------
Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

Klickstein (Rag Doll: A Horrotica Novel) compiles an oral history of the famous kid-oriented TV channel that started in the late 1970s as Pinwheel Network and became Nickelodeon. The oral history approach allows for unmediated stories and encompasses a diverse set of opinions without prioritizing one voice more than others. Actors open up about going through puberty while on TV and the musician Mark Mulcahy, from the late-80s band Miracle Legion, talks about developing the theme song for the show The Adventures of Pete & Pete. The book contains a recipes for Nick's famed green slime, discussions of the concept behind the logo and mission--"‘have fun' and… ‘we like orange'"--and speculation about the effects of the network's success. In the words of Alan Goodman, a writer Hey Dude and Clarissa Explains It All, "Grown-ups took control of the slime and made it pretty." The book's strength--it's grounding in oral history--is also its biggest weakness. Klickstein provides little to no context, besides a who's who list at the back of the book, so it's very easy to get lost in interviews. There's a wealth of information, but it can be hard to parse. Agent: Janet Rosen, Sheree Bykofsky Associates, Inc. (Sept.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

----------------------