Reviews for Mi Mundo/My World


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2002 Spring
This is a Spanish edition of [cf2]My World,[cf1] the companion to [cf2]Goodnight Moon.[cf1] The translator manages to catch the spirit of BrownÆs combination of poetry and prose, even creating some rhymes of her own. But the original text's awkwardness and random progression is reflected here. There are a couple of words that may be unfamiliar to some, but which can be understood in the context of the illustrations. Also available in English. Copyright 2002 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2009 Spring
These two lap-sized board books are handsomely produced editions of unremarkable picture books. [cf2]My World[cf1], billed as a companion to [cf2]Goodnight Moon[cf1], lacks the latter's organizational logic. [cf2]Goodnight Moon 123[cf1] uses fragments of Hurd's art and Brown's text to teach numbers. [Review covers these titles: [cf2]Goodnight Moon 123[cf1] and [cf2]My World[cf1].] Copyright 2009 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2001 July #1
First published in 1949, this looks and reads just like its predecessor Goodnight, Moon, with a series of cozy domestic scenes featuring a bunny family matched to childlike rhymes, some of which-"My dog. / Daddy's dog. / Daddy's dog / Once caught a frog"-is engaging silly talk, more about sound than meaning. Here the young narrator articulates the concepts of "mine," "yours," and "ours," while cataloguing familiar sights and possessions, so this may help children (or adults, for that matter) who don't quite have those distinctions clear yet. One scene showing Father, Mother, and Child sharing the bathroom may explain why the original was allowed to pass out of print, but these days it shouldn't raise any eyebrows. (Picture book. 3-6)Copyright Kirkus 2001 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2001 July #3
Originally published in 1949 (two years after Goodnight Moon) and out of print for more than 30 years, this melodic companion narrated by the endearing rabbit child introduces those elements of his life that he holds most dear. Brown's minimal text has a dreamlike, impressionistic quality reminiscent of her earlier book, yet the narrative adheres to a child's sense of logic as the bunny strings together the items and activities that fill his day. He defines his world in terms of his parents: "Daddy's boy./ Mother's boy./ My boy is just a toy/ Bear." In alternating spreads, Hurd portrays simple, black-and-white images of items or pastimes (the child's toothbrush hanging on a hook next to his father's; father and son fishing together) and full-color scenarios (recolored by Clement's son Thacher) spawned by those images (the boy brushes his teeth as one parent soaks in the tub and the other primps in front of a mirror; the family gathers around the table to dine on freshly caught fish). The final color spread underscores the volume's universality, as well as the little rabbit's contentment: swinging from a tree branch as his parents sit nearby on the porch, he announces: "Your world./ My world./ I can swing/ Right over the world." The volume's words and pictures stretch the boundaries of its time-honored predecessor, affirming that there is, indeed, a warm and welcoming world beyond the great green room. Ages 1-4. (Sept.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2003 January #4
Originally published in 1949 (two years after its companion, Goodnight Moon), My World by Margaret Wise Brown, illus. by Clement Hurd, was reissued in 2001 (after being out of print for more than 30 years)-and here neatly adapts to a board book format. PW wrote, "The volume's words and pictures stretch the boundaries of its time-honored predecessor, affirming that there is, indeed, a warm and welcoming world beyond the great green room." Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2004 February #2
"This melodic companion to Goodnight Moon, narrated by the endearing rabbit child, introduces those elements of his life that he holds most dear," wrote PW. Ages 1-4. (Feb.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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