Reviews for Li'l Rabbit's Kwanzaa


Booklist Reviews 2010 November #1
Being the youngest in the family is hard for Li'l Rabbit at Kwanzaa. Unlike his siblings, he can't create elaborate gifts to share. He does find a way to contribute to the celebration, though. Granna is too sick to cook the big feast, Karamu, that she usually prepares. Li'l Rabbit remembers Granna saying that Kwanzaa is a special time for helping others, and he tells the family's animal friends that she is ill. In a warm surprise, the animals come together with food and gifts to celebrate with Granna. From bespectacled Poppa Squirrel reading in a tree and carpenter Groundhog with his tool belt to Momma Field Mouse pulling her children in a wagon, the characters in Evans' very bright, playful, textured pictures capture the spirit of community that is the essence of the holiday. The two final pages about "The Nguzo Saba--The Seven Principles of Kwanzaa" will take kids back to the story to find the holiday message in action. Copyright 2010 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2011 Spring
Granna Rabbit is too sick to prepare the Karamu banquet for Kwanzaa. Li'l Rabbit gets a gentle lesson in the holiday's meaning as he searches for something to help his grandmother feel better. The plot is slight but enough to pull young listeners along; Evans's fanciful paintings feature a host of helpful animal characters, each imaginatively dressed and posed along Li'l Rabbit's route. Copyright 2010 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2010 #6
Li'l Rabbit feels left out of the Kwanzaa preparations: "He couldn't remember the names of all the days. He wasn't allowed to light the candles." Worst of all, his beloved Granna Rabbit is sick and unable to prepare the Karamu banquet. Li'l Rabbit gets a gentle lesson in the meaning of the holiday as he wanders through the neighborhood in search of something to help his grandmother feel better. The plot is slight but enough to pull young listeners along; Evans's fanciful paintings feature a host of helpful animal characters, each imaginatively dressed and posed along the route of Li'l Rabbit's quest. The closing Karamu is a feast of food and friendship. Harambee! roger Sutton Copyright 2010 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2010 September #1

Li'l Rabbit is not having a good Kwanzaa. Granna Rabbit is sick this year and unable to prepare the big feast called Karamu—Li'l Rabbit's favorite. A disappointed Li'l Rabbit hopes to make Granna Rabbit feel better by giving her a special treat. But what could it be? In a familiar literary pattern, Li'l Rabbit sets off, sharing his idea with other forest animals along the way. None of them knows much about Kwanzaa, but they all love Granna Rabbit. Just when Li'l Rabbit gives up, he returns home to find all the animals have gathered to make the best Karamu ever. Toasty, comforting hues and one plucky little rabbit (tongue stuck out in determination) capture the heart of this holiday—coming together to help others. The Nguzo Saba, or seven principles of Kwanzaa, are appended. (Picture book. 3-7)

Copyright Kirkus 2010 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2010 October

K-Gr 1--Feeling too small to be of any use, Li'l Rabbit leaves the house to find something special for his sick grandmother during Karamu, a Kwanzaa feast. Each animal he encounters (Momma Oriole, Groundhog, frogs, etc.) has been on the receiving end of Granna Rabbit's generosity in the past and wants to help in some way. Without realizing it, Li'l Rabbit brings together a whole community for the "the best Karamu ever." The Seven Principles of Kwanzaa are listed at the end of the book, providing the only direct details about the holiday. The yellow undertones (like the interior of the Rabbit family's earthy, mustard-colored home) add warmth to the cartoon artwork. Sweetly capturing the spirit of the season, the story comes in handy as a lovely supplement to resources that provide straightforward facts about Kwanzaa.--Joanna K. Fabicon, Los Angeles Public Library

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