Reviews for St. Patrick's Day


Booklist Reviews 2010 January #1
The latest in the Rockwells' long-running holiday series, which takes place mostly in the elementary-school classroom of Mrs. Madoff, this picture book showcases a harmonious, multicultural group of students ready to learn more about other cultures. On the opening spread, the mother-and-daughter team dispense with the most obvious of St. Patrick's Day trappings: the wearing of green. (No mention of pinching those who disobey.) Instead, happy groups of two and three work on holiday projects, including a play featuring St. Patrick and a bunch of fleeing snakes (made from socks). Anne Rockwell's text is light and appealingly conversational, while Lizzy Rockwell's illustrations are cheerful and unobtrusive. Copyright 2010 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2010 Fall
On St. Patrick's Day, Evan and his classmates (all dressed in green, of course) present reports on the history and legends of St. Patrick. When Evan goes home, his Irish American mother bakes soda bread that they share with their neighbors. The pedestrian story and cheerful illustrations provide a serviceable introduction to Irish American customs. Copyright 2010 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2010 March #1
The Rockwells mother and daughter bring to St. Patrick's Day the same cogent, ecumenical treatment they've brought to the other titles in the Mrs. Madoff series (Presidents' Day, 2008, etc.). "On St. Patrick's Day," says Evan, "I wore my green shirt, green pants, and even my green striped socks. Pablo wore green sneakers." Once at school, the kids work on their St. Patrick's Day projects: Three kids write a story, two put on a play, three others perform a jig and two do a report on the shamrock. It's exactly the same scene that's played out in elementary schools across the country every March, and as such it will be sweetly familiar to readers. Given the paucity of books on the subject despite perennial demand, it will be deservedly welcomed by teachers in many settings. (Picture book. 3-6) Copyright Kirkus 2010 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2010 January

K-Gr 2--The children in Mrs. Madoff's classroom are once again participating in holiday-related activities: wearing something green, writing reports, acting in a play, dancing a jig. Evan is lucky enough to be all Irish, and he shows a picture of himself on a visit to his grandparents in Ireland. At home, he continues to celebrate. Lizzy Rockwell's clear, vivid spreads evoke an active learning environment (though really now, 10 students?). The title does not mention Catholicism or Patrick's role as a Saint, and avoids any religious elements in the traditions (the three leaves of a shamrock are usually said to represent the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, but not here). However, St. Patrick's Day has become a secular holiday, and this welcome addition to the series clearly outlines the importance of this day in March on which everyone is Irish.--Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC

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