Reviews for Goodnight Goodnight Sleepyhead


Booklist Reviews 2004 May #1
PreS. Forty years after Krauss first published Eyes Nose Fingers Toes, Dyer gives the old favorite a new title and creates new, clear, beautiful watercolor pictures of a toddler cuddling a doll, nose to nose with a teddy bear, toe to toe with a soft dinosaur, then touching windows, doors, walls, floor, chairs, and finally tucked in bed, "sleepyhead." The elemental rhyme and the spacious pictures from the toddler's viewpoint make this a great companion to Margaret Wise Brown's classic Good Night, Moon. ((Reviewed May 1, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2004 Fall
Dyer's sweet art is a fine match for Krauss's bedtime rhyme in this re-illustrated and re-titled edition of [cf2]Eyes Nose Fingers Toes[cf1]. Young listeners will enjoy the large, gently humorous illustrations of a cherubic-looking toddler tucking her doll and stuffed animals into bed for the night. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2004 May #1
Krauss's blatant variation on Goodnight Moon, originally published as Eyes, Nose, Fingers, Toes (1964) with illustrations by Elizabeth Schneider, gets an intimate remake thanks to Dyer's gentle sleepy-time scenes of a chubby, rosebud-lipped toddler surrounded by plush companions-each of which (child included) gets put to bed to a rhythmic litany: "Goodnight windows / Goodnight doors / Goodnight walls / Goodnight floors." A dinosaur toy provides the only bit of updating here; otherwise the art is as time-unspecific as the text. Dyer's illustrations are typically in an oversized format, each double-paged spread on 10 x 10 pages, a different pastel background on each, allowing the full effect of her soft colors to envelope the reader. Often the plush animal takes up the entire two pages. Then, when she gets to the walls, windows, and doors, she reverts to one page for each, setting the scene against stark white backgrounds, and coming back to the pastel for the closing shot of mother and child. Short, sweet-and comfortably familiar. (Picture book. 3-5). . .Kurtz, JaneTHE FEVERBIRD'S CLAWGreenwillow/HarperCollins (304 pp.)$15.99PLB $16.89May 1, 2004ISBN: 0-06-000820-2PLB: 0-06-000821-0A gripping prehistoric adventure fantasy channels a timely message about tolerance and social justice. Moralin, a highborn maiden of sophisticated, stratified, silk-trading Delagua, has to abandon her secret warrior training as she enters adolescence and cloistered temple service. But when captured by a barbaric enemy tribe, Moralin must draw on her forbidden skills, and rely on her heritage and her goddess's guidance. For the outside world is both dangerous and marvelous, and the alien peoples are not as despicable as she had always believed; even the goddess's voice can be ambiguous. From the riveting first sentence to the exultant final exclamation, Kurtz interweaves meticulous world-building, thrilling exploits, and moments of transcendent wonder. Moralin is an utterly convincing heroine: proud, resilient, and unflinchingly honest. While her smug conviction of Delaguan superiority grates, it makes her dawning social awareness even more poignant. Unfortunately, the tight reliance on such a xenophobic viewpoint leaves the remaining characters (and their cultures) tantalizingly vague. Readers will ache to learn more about her world and her future-just like Moralin herself. (Fiction. 10+) Copyright Kirkus 2004 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2004 May #5
Jane Dyer brings her tender touch to a bedtime book by Ruth Krauss in Goodnight Goodnight Sleepyhead, which pairs text from Krauss's 1964 Eyes Nose Fingers Toes with Dyer's characteristically affectionate watercolors of a toddler and ever-patient mother. A "Baby Sleeping" door hanger is included. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2004 July
PreS-Dyer illustrates a text that was originally published as Eyes Nose Fingers Toes (Harper & Row, 1964; o.p.). Gentle rhymes tell the story of a toddler saying good night to her surroundings, her stuffed animals, and her mother. She snuggles her lamb, touches noses with her bear, and compares toes with her dinosaur. The simple spreads on which the baby bids good night to her toys are awash with soothing pastel watercolor backgrounds. While the stuffed animals are endearing, the child and her mother are not as appealing; they have old-fashioned, doll-like, and expressionless round faces delineated by a few simple lines and tiny rosebud mouths. The few pages where there is more color, detail, pattern, and activity work the best.-Shelley B. Sutherland, Niles Public Library District, IL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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