Reviews for Thanksgiving Day


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 September 1999
Ages 2^-5. In this clever book-within-a-book, a preschooler explains what he has learned about the first Thanksgiving. He and his classmates perform a play based on a book the teacher has read. On one page of each double-page spread, the children are pictured in their different roles; on the other page is a corresponding illustration from the teacher's book. The narrator, who plays the Mayflower, is shown holding a large paper ship on one page; opposite is a depiction of a ship on a turbulent sea. Sarah, a Pilgrim, holds sprigs of wild cranberries and explains how we came to eat cranberry sauce on Thanksgiving. Rockwell's excellent research is evident. She even includes a note about recent evidence indicating that the Pilgrims actually were first to set foot at Plymouth Rock^-it's not just legend after all. Great for preschoolers, the story might even inspire a little acting. ((Reviewed September 1, 1999)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2000 Spring
After listening to the story of the first Thanksgiving, some preschoolers offer their own thanks by way of a reenactment. Left-hand pages show a child dressed in costume, while facing pages show the historical scene being acted out. With both text and art blandly portraying an all-smiles relationship between the Native Americans and the Pilgrims, this mildly educational book seems sanitized as much as simplified.Copyright 2000 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 1999 July #2
The Rockwells (Halloween Day, 1997, etc.) demystify a great American holiday for the preschool set. Among the mysteries revealed are why turkey is always on the menu along with cranberry sauce and corn bread. In simple, straightforward language, the author relates the history of the first Thanksgiving through the eyes of a preschooler. Students in Mrs. Madoff's class enact a play about the events surrounding the first gathering; every character recites a piece of Thanksgiving lore while describing the things for which one can be grateful. Throughout the book, the generosity and goodwill among the Pilgrims and Wampanoag is underscored, providing a stellar example of how two disparate groups achieved a mutual goal of survival. The beguiling illustrations feature doe-eyed children and include several historical ``snap shots'' depicting events from the time of the first Thanksgiving. An agreeable, unbiased explanation of a cherished day. (Picture book. 2-5) Copyright 1999 Kirkus Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 1999 October
PreS-Gr 2-Just as they did in Halloween Day (HarperCollins, 1997), the Rockwells answer the many questions young readers have about one of America's holidays. Traditions are described through the voice of a preschool boy. The child and his classmates take different roles in a class play, and each character explains why he or she is thankful. The page facing each cameo features a "snapshot" of a historical incident such as the landing at Plymouth Rock or the Thanksgiving feast. Rockwell's cartoon illustrations of dewy-eyed preschoolers in their various roles combine with the simple text to create an excellent example of a holiday concept book for inquisitive young readers.-Betsy Barnett, Eads School District, CO Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

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