Reviews for All Things Bright and Beautiful


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2002 Spring
Illustrations of a girl and her dog enjoying natureÆs wonders while relaxing and doing light chores on a farm accompany couplets from the well-known hymn. Although the pictures focus the readerÆs attention more on the girl than on her natural surroundings, the book still offers a quiet reflection on GodÆs presence in the world. Music is included at the bookÆs end. Copyright 2002 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 2001 July #1
All things are indeed "bright and beautiful" in the serene, sharply detailed country scenes Whatley (Wait! No Paint, p. 669, etc.) has created for this familiar 19th-century hymn. With creamy, photorealistic clarity, the artist portrays an overall-clad child visiting barn and orchard, pausing to admire a golden sky, coming home after her ramble with a basket of apples, an armful of cattails-and a story, or perhaps a poem, with which to regale her fond family before bedtime. Everything from faces and livestock to compositions and rich colors are so natural, so harmonious that viewers will feel elevated even if they don't know the song. The verses are recapitulated, with musical arrangement, at the end. Lovely. (Picture book/poetry. 5-9)Copyright Kirkus 2001 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1985 September #4
Wyllie's rescript of a cumulative folk tale is the basis for a jolly game to play while finding out how the old woman copes with her vexations. In pleasing colors, Roffey shows the grandmother ly person peacefully at home in her country cottage, accepting a little gray mouse as a guest. But then the mouse begins to scratch and squeak all night and the woman can't sleep. She brings home a cat to control the mouse but the cat, having dislodged the pest, becomes another problem, meowing all night. A dog seems the answer to handling the cat but he barks so the poor, tired wom an adopts a cow that eats the thatched roof of her little house. On pages oppo site the scenes of nonstop doings, the operative words appear on flaps to lift and reveal miniatures (also in birght color) of the reluctant hostess, the ani mals and the attractive appointments of the little house. (48) Copyright 1985 Cahners Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1985 October #1
Wyllie's rescript of a cumulative folk tale is the basis for a jolly game to play while finding out how the old woman copes with her vexations. In pleasing colors, Roffey shows the grandmotherly person peacefully at home in her country cottage, accepting a little gray mouse as a guest. But then the mouse begins to scratch and squeak all night and the woman can't sleep. She brings home a cat to control the mouse but the cat, having dislodged the pest, becomes another problem, meowing all night. A dog seems the answer to handling the cat but he barks, so the poor, tired woman adopts a cow that eats the thatched roof of her little house. On pages opposite the scenes of nonstop doings, the operative words appear on flaps to lift and reveal miniatures (also in bright color) of the reluctant hostess, the animals and the attractive appointments of the little house. (48) Copyright 1985 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2001 October
K-Gr 2-Whatley has interpreted this 19th-century hymn, which celebrates both nature and the omnipotence of the Creator, in beautiful, panoramic watercolor paintings. They feature a girl dressed in dungaree overalls, a straw hat, and boots walking on a farm with her dog. The illustrations are consistent in their wonderful, soft colors. However, the artist's talent overwhelms the simple text. Notes and lyrics appear on the last two pages.-Barbara Buckley, Rockville Centre Public Library, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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