Reviews for Great Gatsby


AudioFile Reviews 2003 April/May
THE GREAT GATSBY, F. Scott Fitzgerald's snapshot of the decadence and excess of the Jazz Age, is a literary classic that has been frequently and successfully performed on both screen and stage. Although Gatsby has been recorded previously on audio, Tim Robbins's reading is surely one of the best. Robbins excels in giving each of the characters a distinct persona, conveying emotion with an almost elegant sense of detachment. The final tape contains letters from Fitzgerald to his agent, and others, about the book. These candid letters are fascinating, and Robert Sean Leonard reads them with the smugness one would expect from Fitzgerald. The letters add a different, and fascinating, perspective to Fitzgerald and the times in which he lived. D.J.S. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award, 2003 Audie Award Finalist (c) AudioFile 2003, Portland, Maine

----------------------
Booklist Monthly Selections - # 2 March 2003
Robbins' reading of The Great Gatsby resonates with moral disgust as he portrays narrator Nick Carraway, who hates the wealthy but shows respect for Jay Gatsby, who is never able to capture the one thing he wants, elusive Daisy Buchanan. Another reader, Robert Sean Leonard, presents Fitzgerald's correspondence in a matter-of-fact manner that echoes the contents of the letters. The classic story of self-reliance, Walden is perfectly narrated by Morgan, who relays all the subtleties of Thoreau's philosophy. Morgan's reading sounds so nineteenth century that one can almost hear Thoreau saying, "Most men live lives of quiet desperation." --Mary McCay Copyright 2003 Booklist Reviews

----------------------
Publishers Weekly Reviews 2002 December #1
Readers in that sizeable group of people who think The Great Gatsby is the Great American Novel will be delighted with Robbins's subtle, brainy and immensely touching new reading. There have been audio versions of Gatsby before this-by Alexander Scourby and Christopher Reeve, to name two-but actor/director Robbins brings a fresh and bracing vision that makes the story gleam. From the jaunty irony of the title page quote ("Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover, I must have you!") to the poetry of Fitzgerald's ending about "the dark fields of the republic" and "boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past," Robbins conjures up a sublime portrait of a lost world. And as a bonus, the excellent audio actor Robert Sean Leonard reads a selection of Fitzgerald's letters to editors, agents and friends which focus on the writing and selling of the novel. Listeners will revel in learning random factoids, e.g., in 1924, Scott and Zelda were living in a Rome hotel that cost just over $500 a month, and he was respectfully suggesting that his agent Harold Ober ask $15,000 from Liberty magazine for the serial rights to Gatsby. (Oct.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

----------------------