Reviews for Goldie and the Three Bears


Booklist Reviews 2003 November #1
Reviewed with Jim Aylesworth's Goldilocks and the Three Bears.PreS-Gr. 1. Is there room for two more versions of Goldilocks? Yes, if it's space for these two. Although as different from each other as peas and pies, both are delightful and will attract their own audience, with some children preferring the traditional story and others gravitating to the fresh and funny version. Although Aylesworth follows the standard telling, he adds decorative touches in the text. McClintock's art is also traditional. Executed in watercolor, sepia ink, and gouache, her pictures have a nodding acquaintance with Tenniel's artwork for Alice, but the Victorian sensibility is interrupted here and there with some humorous details, particularly the expressions on Goldilock's face. Stanley's Goldie is a modern-day kid. She has definite likes and dislikes about food, clothes, and even friends: Jenny is too boring; Alicia is too snobby. One day, Goldie gets off the school bus at the wrong stop and wanders into a strange house. Children may think they know the rest, but in the end, the little bear girl turns out to be just the friend Goldie has been looking for. Stanley's art, so sophisticated in her biographies, is delightfully childlike here, with lots of fun in every scene. ((Reviewed November 1, 2003)) Copyright 2003 Booklist Reviews

----------------------
Horn Book Guide Reviews 2004 Spring
This very contemporary Goldie will surely be faulted when she gets off the school bus at the wrong stop and, in search of a phone to call her mother, goes unbidden and unattended into a strange house. What will the return of the three bears mean to this golden-curled, iron-willed girl? The answer--unpredictable yet predestined--is a friend to cleave to ""with all her heart."" The saucy and tender pictures are closely integrated with the snappy text. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

----------------------
Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2003 #5
Goldilocks had a lot to answer for--trespassing, misappropriation, plain thievery. Though feminism has given her temerity a positive gloss, the young listener is still likely to share the baby bear's outrage at this interloper and the three bears' satisfaction at her rout. Stanley's ornery, ardent, very contemporary Goldie will surely be faulted by militants of various stripes when she gets off the school bus at the wrong stop and, in search of a phone to call her mother, goes unbidden and unattended into a strange house. A good many well-trained children, too, are likely to gasp at her risky behavior--even as they know, thanks to the title and the stuffed bear that accompanies her everywhere, that no real harm will befall her in the bosky cottage. (If the book has a flaw, it's the lack of a clear transition between the two realms.) But in the usual course of events, what will the return of the three bears mean to this golden-curled, iron-willed girl who knows exactly what she likes ("PLAIN pasta with JUST butter and NO green things, please") and who she doesn't want to play with ("Jenny was too boring, Penny was too rough...")? The answer--unpredictable yet predestined--is a friend to cleave to, "with all her heart." Outraged at the sight of Goldie in her bed, the baby bear takes a running leap; Goldie goes flying, Baby Bear goes flying; and, bouncing together on the bed, the two traditional adversaries become playmates. The pictures alone are delectable, at once saucy and tender. The snappy text, with which they're closely integrated, reads like Charlotte Zolotow or Arnold Lobel of yore. Think of Goldie as an add-on, not a take-off. Copyright 2003 Horn Book Magazine Reviews

----------------------
Kirkus Reviews 2003 August #1
Stanley reinvents another familiar tale, this one in a modern setting. Goldie's finicky about her food, clothes, and friends, but when she finds something just right, she loves it "with all her heart." One day she steps off the school bus at the wrong stop, and, looking for a place to call her mom, finds an invitingly empty house. Confident but not spoiled-looking beneath her great mane of curly hair, Goldie comes off as a child with a natural streak of curiosity. While waiting for the house's residents to show up, she samples the sandwiches on the kitchen table, finds a chair in which to snuggle down with a favorite book, and then checks out the bedroom. A family of bears in dowdy-looking clothing appears-but when the furious baby bear tries to bounce Goldie out of bed, the two discover the pleasures of bed-bouncing, and instantly hit it off. "She's just right!" Goldie happily proclaims to her mother on the later drive home. So is the tone of this imaginative update. (Picture book/folktale. 6-8) Copyright Kirkus 2003 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

----------------------
Library Media Connection Reviews 2004 March
There are more than enough versions of the Goldilocks story to constitute a good unit study, so why add one more? The answer is that this one takes a new look at the bad girl of the forest. Rather than presenting Goldilocks as a disobedient daughter who is guilty of breaking and entering, author Diane Stanley portrays her as a misunderstood child in search of just the right friend. None of the girls she knows seems to match up the way she wants. When an unfortunate mistake lands her lost in the woods, Goldie finds a nearby home from which to call her mother. As the reader can guess, it is the home of the three bears. Goldie looks around inside and finds the perfect sandwich, the perfect chair, a copy of her favorite book, and a cozy bed. When the bears return, Goldie and the baby bear find an instant connection and become the best of friends. The text of the story is simple, and the large size of the book makes it good for read-alouds. The illustrations are engaging-especially the fi al one of Goldie and her new friend cavorting happily in a pile of autumn leaves. This will add a new contrast to the other Goldilocks stories. Recommended. Carol Lynch, Ph.D., Teacher, Medary Elementary, Columbus, Ohio © 2004 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

----------------------
Publishers Weekly Reviews 2003 August #3
In Stanley's (Rumplestiltskin's Daughter) witty re-creation of a familiar tale, she characterizes Goldilocks as a wide-eyed, golden-haired heroine who knows exactly what she likes ("I want plain pasta with just butter and no green things, please") but is also quite lonely. These traits go along way to explain Goldie's behavior when she gets off at the wrong bus stop one day and knocks on the Three Bears' house to use their phone (no one is home). It turns out that she and Baby Bear share some things in common: she likes Baby Bear's food best, they like the same book (Bears!) and, when the cub discovers Goldie in her bed, they find jumping on it superior to fighting over it. In the story's upbeat ending, Goldie finds a fast friend in Baby Bear. Stanley shapes an especially endearing version of this classic with numerous fresh and funny textual and visual flourishes (e.g., she establishes Goldie's interest in bears with a stuffed teddy that "she loved... with all her heart" and bear paintings on her bedroom wall; the anthropomorphic Mama Bear wears a vermilion dress and pearls, and her high-heeled slippers lie next to her elegantly carved sleigh bed). Stanley also cashes in on readers' familiarity with the tale ("It will not surprise you to learn/ that [Goldie] found three beds.../ and that one was too soft,..."). An appealing take on the character of Goldilocks and on her escapade. Ages 5-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

----------------------
Publishers Weekly Reviews 2007 January #4
"In Stanley's witty retelling, she characterizes Goldilocks as a wide-eyed, golden-haired heroine who knows exactly what she likes," wrote PW. Ages 5-8. (Jan.) Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

----------------------
School Library Journal Reviews 2003 November
PreS-Gr 1-One of Goldilocks's qualities-her desire to have things "just right"-is extended into a charming story. "It was hard work finding the perfect hat, a really comfortable sweater, or shoes that didn't pinch her toes. But it was worth the effort, because when Goldie loved something, she loved it with all her heart." What's missing in her life is just the right friend. One day, she gets off the bus at the wrong stop and wanders into a little brick house at the end of a winding path. What she finds there will bring a smile to every child who is looking for a friend who's "not too bossy," "Not too boring," and "Not too snobby or silly or rough." The writing is smooth, concise, and rhythmic. The author's voice peeks through now and then, adding an understated humor that kids will love. "When she had finished the book, Goldie peeked into the next room. It will not surprise you to learn that she found three beds in there." And the pictures are marvelous, with fine lines; soft, glowing colors; and winsome, telling details. Many contemporary retellings of familiar fairy tales are successful in a clever way, but this goes beyond clever to also have real substance. A 24-carat selection for many children, especially those who like things just so.-Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

----------------------