Annotations for Princess and the Peas and Carrots


Baker & Taylor
"Most of the time, Rosebud is Good Princess Rosebud, but she can become Princess Fussy. This new rendition of The Princess and the Pea features a little girl who needs certain things to be 'just so.'"--

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Baker & Taylor
A persnickety and fussy princess tests her parents' patience by refusing to eat peas or carrots if either touches the other on her plate, a decided preference that leads to a mutual understanding of the royal reason she is so particular.

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Baker & Taylor
A persnickety and fussy princess tests her parents' patience by refusing to eat peas or carrots if either touches the other on her plate, a decided preference that leads to a mutual understanding of the royal reason she is so particular. Illustrated by the artist of What's New at the Zoo?

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Perseus Publishing
Most of the time she is good Princess Rosebud. But when there's a hole in her sock, or her sweater is itchy, or?ick!?the peas on her plate are smushed up right next to the carrots, this strong-willed little miss becomes the picky and prickly Princess Fussy. Sound Familiar? The clever rendition of The Princess and the Pea offers a funny, insightful reflection of how important having certain things be "just so" can be to certain kids. Everyone will cheer the surprising twist that reveals why Rosebud cannot get comfy at bedtime. Is it simply the return of Princess Fussy? Or might there be a more royal reason for her finicky convictions?


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Random House, Inc.
Rosebud is a little girl who likes everything "just so"--her outfits, her room, her meals, etc. When presented with a dinner plate whose meal components are decidedly not "just so"--she pushes it all away, and, right off the table. Fuming and feeling misunderstood, she is sent to her room where she throws an enormous tantrum. Now, nothing is just so and everything is not right. After securing her promise to stop fussing, her parents help her get things back in good order, and the peas and carrots turn out to be really quite delicious. Then, after her father reads her the story of "The Princess and the Pea", Rosebud wants to be a good girl and go to sleep but her bed feels awful and lumpy and just not right. Is it the return of Princess Fussy? No! There is in fact a misplaced marble under her mattress that would make sleeping unbearable for any "real princess"--like Rosebud.

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