Annotations for Freedom on the Menu : The Greensboro Sit-Ins


Baker & Taylor
Having always lived a life where they couldn't drink from the white fountains or swim at the local pools, a group of four teens decide to fight the system in the segregated South of the 1960s by taking seats at a lunch counter and requesting to be served--just the same and equal as every white person in the establishment.

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Baker & Taylor
The 1960 civil rights sit-ins at the Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, are seen through the eyes of a young Southern black girl.

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Penguin Putnam
When four courageous black teens sat down at a lunch counter in the segregated South of 1960, the reverberations were felt both far beyond and close to home. This insightful story offers a child's-eye view of this seminal event in the American Civil Rights Movement. Connie is used to the signs and customs that have let her drink only from certain water fountains and which bar her from local pools and some stores, but still . . . she'd love to sit at the lunch counter, just like she's seen other girls do.
Showing how an ordinary family becomes involved in the great and personal cause of their times, it's a tale that invites everyone to celebrate our country's everyday heroes, of all ages.



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