Annotations for George Vs. George : The American Revolution as Seen from Both Sides


Baker & Taylor
Explores how the characters and lives of King George III of England and George Washington affected the progress and outcome of the American Revolution.

----------------------
Baker & Taylor
Takes a unique and lively approach to the story of the American Revolution by weaving the tale around two quite similar leaders--George Washington and King George III--offering insights into the actions and convictions of participants on both sides of the Atlantic.

----------------------
Random House, Inc.
There are two sides to every story. Rosalyn Schanzer's engaging and wonderfully illustrated book brings to life both sides of the American Revolution.

The narrative introduces anew the two enemies, both named George: George Washington, the man who freed the American colonies from the British, and George III, the British king who lost them. Two leaders on different sides of the Atlantic, yet with more in common than we sometimes acknowledge. We are lead through their story, and the story of their times, and see both sides of the arguments that divided the colonies from the Kingdom. Was King George a "Royal Brute" as American patriots claimed? Or was he, as others believed, "the father of the people?" Was George Washington a scurrilous traitor, as all the king's supporters claimed? Or should we remember and celebrate him as "the father of his country?" Who was right? History teaches us that there are two sides to every story.

Rosalyn Schanzer's book is an accessible account of one the most vital periods in American history. It is also a timeless lesson in seeing history from different points of view. The author spent two years researching books, paintings, cartoons, and descriptions of Revolutionary times. She uses art, text, and first-hand accounts to illustrate how history should never be reduced to simplistic conflicts between the "good guys" and the "bad guys." Her illustrations, and her engaging quote bubbles, bring the Revolution to life again, and allow the characters of the period to speak for themselves. Through its lively text, detailed illustrations, and fully authenticated quotes, George vs. George shines fresh light on both sides of the story of our country's formative years.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

----------------------
Simon and Schuster
There were once two enemies who were both named George-George Washington and George III. They were very much alike in some ways, and they were both beloved by their people. But wars alter perceptions of people and interpretations of events. Because the winners tend to tell the tale, very few people in the United States have ever considered the British side of the American Revolution. In George vs. George, Roz Schanzer deftly shifts her perspective and includes primary source quotes from people on both sides of the Atlantic and both sides of the conflict. (There were loyalists in the Colonies and people who supported American independence in England.) The book compares the two Georges, who turn out to be remarkably similar men; talks about what life was like for people in England and in the Colonies on the eve of the Revolution; explains how the government of England worked and also how the Colonial governments worked; and then begins the story of the Revolutionary War. After the Stamp Act, the tax on tea, the boycotts, the Boston Tea Party, and the Boston Massacre come the early battles. The book includes a wonderful description of what led up to the Battles of Lexington and Concord. From the British point of view, the famous British crossing of Boston Harbor and march to Concord immortalized in "Paul Revere's Ride" were preemptive strikes against a weapons stockpile amassed by dangerous American insurgents. Coverage of the war includes spreads about the composition of the British and Colonial forces as well as the Declaration of Independence. The book ends with the stories of what happened to the two Georges after the American Revolution. As the main text and pictures tell the main story, small paintings of historical figures in the margins comment on the events in their own words, which are drawn from primary sources. This older picture book, perfect for 5th graders studying American history, also includes a note from the author, bibliography, source notes, a timeline, and an index

----------------------