Annotations for Jane Eyre


Baker & Taylor
A Victorian governess's love for her mysterious employer is threatened by the tragic secret of his mansion

----------------------
Blackwell North Amer
Jane Eyre is a wildly emotional romance, with a lonely heroine and a tormented Byronic hero, pathetic orphans, dark secrets, and a madwoman in the attic. When it was published in 1847 it was a great popular success. The power of the writing, the masterly handling of narrative, and the boldly realistic style were much admired. But when Currer Bell, the pseudonymous author, was revealed to be Charlotte Bronte, a young woman from a bleak Yorkshire parsonage, critics were disapproving. Jane Eyre is full of erotic tension, passion, and irony. These were not qualities encouraged in Victorian women writers, and Jane Eyre was an "immoral production" to more than one contemporary. For late-twentieth-century readers, however, the book is an astonishing paradigm of feminist writing. At its heart is the assertion that a woman has the right to be independent, and its insistence on that fact and on the equality of the sexes makes it a truly revolutionary work of art.

----------------------
Random House, Inc.
(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

Charlotte Brontë's impassioned novel is the love story of Jane Eyre, a plain yet spirited governess, and her employer, the arrogant, brooding Mr. Rochester. Published in 1847 under the pseudonym Currer Bell, the book heralded a new kind of heroine--one whose virtuous integrity, keen intellect, and tireless perseverance broke through class barriers to win equal stature with the man she loved. Hailed by William Makepeace Thackeray as "the masterwork of a great genius," Jane Eyre is still regarded, over a century later, as one of the finest novels in English literature.

----------------------