Annotations for Examined Life : How We Lose and Find Ourselves


Baker & Taylor
A psychoanalyst draws upon his twenty-year career to describe the hidden motivations that shape our actions, both ordinary and extraordinary, throughout our lives in an effort to understand a better picture of who we are and what we want.

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Baker & Taylor
The author describes his work as a psychoanalyst over a twenty-five year period, describing his efforts to guide his patients to personal insights into their behaviors and resolutions which can change their lives for the better.

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Book News
Grosz presents aphoristic stories drawn from his practice as a psychoanalyst. They are not full case-studies, but vignettes that illustrate common though penetrating problems of the human condition. He considers the passion for ignorance, how paranoia can relieve suffering and prevent a catastrophe, wanting the impossible, how a fear of loss can cause us to lose everything, bearing death, finding closure, and more. His patients, whose stories he relates using pseudonyms, include children and adults. This is not a scholarly book, but a potentially inspiring resource for mental health professionals and lay people alike. There is no index. Annotation ©2013 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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WW Norton
A New York Times "10 Favorite Books of 2013"An extraordinary book for anyone eager to understand the hidden motives that shape our lives.

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WW Norton
We are all storytellers--we create stories to make sense of our lives. But it is not enough to tell tales. There must be someone to listen.In his work as a practicing psychoanalyst, Stephen Grosz has spent the last twenty-five years uncovering the hidden feelings behind our most baffling behavior. The Examined Life distils more than 50,000 hours of conversation into pure psychological insight without the jargon.This extraordinary book is about one ordinary process: talking, listening, and understanding. Its aphoristic and elegant stories teach us a new kind of attentiveness. They also unveil a delicate self-portrait of the analyst at work and show how lessons learned in the consulting room can reveal as much to the analyst as to the patient.These are stories about our everyday lives: they are about the people we love and the lies we tell, the changes we bear and the grief. Ultimately, they show us not only how we lose ourselves but also how we might find ourselves.

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