Annotations for Fiery Trial : Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery


Baker & Taylor
A master historian discusses the life of Abraham Lincoln and the 16th president's personal and political journey to the abolition of slavery and the recognition of former slaves as American citizens. (This title is being re-listed in Forecast.

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Baker & Taylor
Discusses the life of Abraham Lincoln and his personal and political journey to the abolition of slavery and the recognition of former slaves as American citizens.

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Baker & Taylor
In a landmark work of deep scholarship and insight, Foner gives us a life of Lincoln as it intertwined with slavery, the defining issue of the time and the tragic hallmark of American history. The author demonstrates how Lincoln navigated a dynamic political landscape deftly, moving in measured steps, often on a path forged by abolitionists and radicals in his party, and that Lincoln's greatness lay in his capacity for moral and political growth.

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Blackwell Publishing
From a master historian, the story of Lincoln'sùand the nation'sùtransformation through the crucible of slavery and emancipation.

In this landmark work of deep scholarship and live history of Lincoln and the end of slavery in America. Foner begins with Lincoln's youth in Indiana and Illinois and follows the trajectory of his career across an increasingly tense and shifting political terrain from Illinois to Washington, D.C. Although "naturally anti-slavery" for as long as he can remember, Lincoln scrupulously holds to the position that the Constitution protects the institution in the original slave states. But the political landscape is transformed in 1854 when the Kansas-Nebraska Act makes the expansion of slavery a national issue.

A man of considered words and deliberate actions, Lincoln deftly navigates the dynamic politics of antislavery, taking measured steps, often along a path forged by abolitionists and radicals in his party. Lincoln rises to leadership in the new Republican Party by calibrating his politics to the broadest possible antislavery coalition. As president of a divided nation and commander in chief at war, displaying a similar compound of pragmatism and principle, Lincoln finally embraces what he calls the Civil War's "fundamental and astounding" result: the immediate, uncompensated abolition of slavery and recognition of blacks as American citizens.

Foner's Lincoln emerges as a leader, one whose greatness lies in his capacity for moral and political growth through real engagement with allies and critics alike. This powerful work will transform our understanding of the nation's greatest president and the issue that mattered most.

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Book News
The author of many books on U.S. history, Foner (History, Columbia University) traces the evolution of Abraham Lincoln's ideas and policies on slavery from his early career to his presidency, placing Lincoln within the broad spectrum on antislavery thought. The author suggests that it's a mistake to seize on any particular single quotation or speech as representing the "real" Lincoln: Lincoln's thinking evolved over time, Foner shows, and he argues that the hallmark of Lincoln's greatness was his capacity for growth. Showing Lincoln at his best and worst, and outlining his successes and failures, Foner's book gives readers a new way of looking at the man who was arguably our greatest president. This is an essential addition to any library or collection. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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Norton Pub
In this landmark work of deep scholarship and insight, Eric Foner gives us the definitive history of Lincoln and the end of slavery in America. Foner begins with Lincoln's youth in Indiana and Illinois and follows the trajectory of his career across an increasingly tense and shifting political terrain from Illinois to Washington, D.C. Although "naturally anti-slavery" for as long as he can remember, Lincoln scrupulously holds to the position that the Constitution protects the institution in the original slave states. But the political landscape is transformed in 1854 when the Kansas-Nebraska Act makes the expansion of slavery a national issue.

A man of considered words and deliberate actions, Lincoln navigates the dynamic politics deftly, taking measured steps, often along a path forged by abolitionists and radicals in his party. Lincoln rises to leadership in the new Republican Party by calibrating his politics to the broadest possible antislavery coalition. As president of a divided nation and commander in chief at war, displaying a similar compound of pragmatism and principle, Lincoln finally embraces what he calls the Civil War's "fundamental and astounding" result: the immediate, uncompensated abolition of slavery and recognition of blacks as American citizens.

Foner's Lincoln emerges as a leader, one whose greatness lies in his capacity for moral and political growth through real engagement with allies and critics alike. This powerful work will transform our understanding of the nation's greatest president and the issue that mattered most.

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Norton Pub
Winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in History, the Bancroft Prize, and the Lincoln Prize: from a master historian, the story of Lincoln's--and the nation's--transformation through the crucible of slavery and emancipation.

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