Annotations for Singing School : Learning to Write (And Read) Poetry by Studying With the Masters


Baker & Taylor
A former poet laureate provides informative introductions and sidebar notes for more than 80 poems by greats including William Butler Yeats, Emily Dickinson and George Herbert, in an effort to spark pleasure in reading and writing poems. 13,000 first printing.

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Baker & Taylor
A former poet laureate provides introductions and sidebar notes for more than eighty poems by greats including William Butler Yeats, Emily Dickinson, and George Herbert, in an effort to spark pleasure in reading and writing poems.

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Book News
Poet and translator Pinsky offers this unconventional guide to self-teaching poetry. Rather than writing in a systematic instructionalframework, Pinsky presents classic poems along with deliberately vague suggestions for learning from them. Four sections entitled "freedom," "listening," "form," and "dreaming things up" contain brief introductory material on each idea, followed by example poems with suggested exercises or the author's reflections. The preface and open-ended tone of the book emphasize that foremost for a student of poetry is to create their own collection and their own artistic exercises, for which the book in hand is only a model. Annotation ©2013 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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WW Norton
A bold new approach to writing (and reading) poetry based on great poetry of the past.

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WW Norton
Quick, joyful, and playfully astringent, with surprising comparisons and examples, this collection takes an unconventional approach to the art of poetry. Instead of rules, theories, or recipes, Singing School emphasizes ways to learn from great work: studying magnificent, monumentally enduring poems and how they are made-- in terms borrowed from the "singing school" of William Butler Yeats's "Sailing to Byzantium."Robert Pinsky's headnotes for each of the 80 poems and his brief introductions to each section take a writer's view of specific works: William Carlos Williams's "Fine Work with Pitch and Copper" for intense verbal music; Emily Dickinson's "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" for wild imagination in matter-of-fact language; Robert Southwell's "The Burning Babe" for surrealist aplomb; Wallace Stevens's "The House Was Quiet and the World Was Calm" for subtlety in meter. Included are poems by Aphra Behn, Allen Ginsberg, George Herbert, John Keats, Mina Loy, Thomas Nashe, and many other master poets.This anthology respects poetry's mysteries in two senses of the word: techniques of craft and strokes of the inexplicable.

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