Annotations for Undertaking : Life Studies from the Dismal Trade


Baker & Taylor
The author, a poet and an undertaker in a small Michigan town, presents twelve literary essays about the disruption death causes to his fellow townspeople, reflecting on the languages of love and grief and the lessons of mortality.

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Baker & Taylor
The poet and funeral director offers his observations on life, death, and the rituals of society

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Book News
As an undertaker and poet, Lynch pays unique homage to "the living who have died" and funeral rites. He even posits the idea of a golfatorium. Several of these essays appeared previously in Harper's and The London Review of Books . No index. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

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Norton Pub
"Every year I bury a couple hundred of my townspeople." So opens this singular and wise testimony. Like all poets, inspired by death, Thomas Lynch is, unlike others, also hired to bury the dead or to cremate them and to tend to their families in a small Michigan town where he serves as the funeral director. In the conduct of these duties he has kept his eyes open, his ear tuned to the indispensable vernaculars of love and grief. In these twelve pieces his is the voice of both witness and functionary. Here, Lynch, poet to the dying, names the hurts and whispers the condolences and shapes the questions posed by this familiar mystery. So here is homage to parents who have died and to children who shouldn't have. Here are golfers tripping over grave markers, gourmands and hypochondriacs, lovers and suicides. These are the lessons for life our mortality teaches us.

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Norton Pub
A chronicle of small-town life and death told through the eyes of a poet who is also an undertaker.

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